Medical Marijuana Certification, a CME Educational Module, and the Correlation between the two on “high volume” Certifiers in Arizona.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/315822
Title:
Medical Marijuana Certification, a CME Educational Module, and the Correlation between the two on “high volume” Certifiers in Arizona.
Author:
Anand, Keshav
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Apr-2014
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2014 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
In 2010, the Arizona Medical Marijuana Act was passed which required the Arizona Department of Health Services (AZDHS) to establish a medical marijuana program. Since the institution of the program, AZDHS has monitored the “top 24” frequent certifiers for medicinal marijuana who in 2012 accounted for 75% of the total number of marijuana certifications in the state. ADHS contracted with the University Of Arizona College Of Public Health to create a CME module to educate physicians about the medical marijuana act and their responsibilities. Objective: To determine the composition of physicians completing the CME module, to assess the number of certifications written by these physicians, and to understand the trend that has occurred. Results: Among those individuals completing the training module, 25 physicians were identified by ADHS as having certified patients both before and after the module completion. Those 25 physicians account for 8782 certifications prior to the module and 28131 certifications after the institution of the module, a significant increase (p <0.0001). The results are surprising as we expected this number to decrease on the assumption that physicians are over certifying and not cross referencing the Board of Controlled Substances and taking the CME module would educate them on these topics. Hence this study demonstrates that further research is necessary in analyzing physician behavior with regards to medical marijuana certifications, with education of physicians playing a critical role.
Keywords:
Certifier; Certification
MeSH Subjects:
Medical Marijuana; Cannabis; Education, Medical, Continuing
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Foote, Janet PhD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleMedical Marijuana Certification, a CME Educational Module, and the Correlation between the two on “high volume” Certifiers in Arizona.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAnand, Keshaven_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2014-04-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2014 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 2010, the Arizona Medical Marijuana Act was passed which required the Arizona Department of Health Services (AZDHS) to establish a medical marijuana program. Since the institution of the program, AZDHS has monitored the “top 24” frequent certifiers for medicinal marijuana who in 2012 accounted for 75% of the total number of marijuana certifications in the state. ADHS contracted with the University Of Arizona College Of Public Health to create a CME module to educate physicians about the medical marijuana act and their responsibilities. Objective: To determine the composition of physicians completing the CME module, to assess the number of certifications written by these physicians, and to understand the trend that has occurred. Results: Among those individuals completing the training module, 25 physicians were identified by ADHS as having certified patients both before and after the module completion. Those 25 physicians account for 8782 certifications prior to the module and 28131 certifications after the institution of the module, a significant increase (p <0.0001). The results are surprising as we expected this number to decrease on the assumption that physicians are over certifying and not cross referencing the Board of Controlled Substances and taking the CME module would educate them on these topics. Hence this study demonstrates that further research is necessary in analyzing physician behavior with regards to medical marijuana certifications, with education of physicians playing a critical role.en_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subjectCertifieren_US
dc.subjectCertificationen_US
dc.subject.meshMedical Marijuanaen_US
dc.subject.meshCannabisen_US
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical, Continuingen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorFoote, Janet PhDen_US
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