Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/315531
Title:
Arizona Water Resource Vol. 22 No. 1 (Winter 2014)
Author:
University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.; Radonic, Lucero; Cusimano, Jeremy; Megdal, Sharon; McLain, Jean E.; Silvertooth, Jeffrey C.
Publisher:
Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/315531
Additional Links:
https://wrrc.arizona.edu/publications/awr
Abstract:
In January 2014, Arizona will begin its first farmland fallowing and forbearance project. Unlike similar fallowing programs in the West, this project does not transfer the water conserved in the agricultural sector to the municipal sector. For the time being, this program seeks to conserve water in the Colorado River system. The saved water will be maintained in Lake Mead, increasing its dwindling levels and helping forestall shortages to water users in the Lower Colorado River Basin. Since 2000, water levels in Lake Mead have fallen by an alarming 100 feet. If the lake’s elevation falls by another 30 feet, users in the lower basin would face reductions in water allocations.
Type:
text; Newsletter
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Arid regions -- Research -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Research -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Water-supply -- Arizona.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorUniversity of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRadonic, Luceroen_US
dc.contributor.authorCusimano, Jeremyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMegdal, Sharonen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcLain, Jean E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSilvertooth, Jeffrey C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-09T01:22:09Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-09T01:22:09Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/315531-
dc.description.abstractIn January 2014, Arizona will begin its first farmland fallowing and forbearance project. Unlike similar fallowing programs in the West, this project does not transfer the water conserved in the agricultural sector to the municipal sector. For the time being, this program seeks to conserve water in the Colorado River system. The saved water will be maintained in Lake Mead, increasing its dwindling levels and helping forestall shortages to water users in the Lower Colorado River Basin. Since 2000, water levels in Lake Mead have fallen by an alarming 100 feet. If the lake’s elevation falls by another 30 feet, users in the lower basin would face reductions in water allocations.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWater Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://wrrc.arizona.edu/publications/awren_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceWater Resources Research Center. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectArid regions -- Research -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Research -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater-supply -- Arizona.en_US
dc.titleArizona Water Resource Vol. 22 No. 1 (Winter 2014)en_US
dc.typetext-
dc.typeNewsletter-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Water Resources Research Center collection. For more information, please contact the Center, (520) 621-9591 or see http://wrrc.arizona.edu.en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.