Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/314786
Title:
Arroyo Vol. 2 No. 3 (October 1988)
Other Titles:
Reclaimed Water, A Developing Resource To Help Meet State Water Needs
Author:
University of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.
Publisher:
Water Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
Oct-1988
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/314786
Additional Links:
https://wrrc.arizona.edu/publications/arroyo
Abstract:
In its effort to best use all its available water supplies, Arizona must do more than conserve water. The state must also identify and develop new water resources to support its growing population, and effluent is being increasingly looked to as an important and valuable source of water. Plans are under way to develop this resource more fully to reduce groundwater pumpage in the state. (Due to varied usages, the word "effluent" has become an imprecise term. As the word is often used, effluent may refer to untreated wastewater--or it may mean wastewater that has been treated and is available for various uses. To avoid ambiguity the term "reclaimed water" will be used when referring to water resources derived from treated effluent.)
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Water resources development -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Research -- Arizona.; Arid regions -- Research -- Arizona.; Water-supply -- Arizona.
ISSN:
1058-1383

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorUniversity of Arizona. Water Resources Research Center.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-26T19:40:57Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-26T19:40:57Z-
dc.date.issued1988-10-
dc.identifier.issn1058-1383-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/314786-
dc.description.abstractIn its effort to best use all its available water supplies, Arizona must do more than conserve water. The state must also identify and develop new water resources to support its growing population, and effluent is being increasingly looked to as an important and valuable source of water. Plans are under way to develop this resource more fully to reduce groundwater pumpage in the state. (Due to varied usages, the word "effluent" has become an imprecise term. As the word is often used, effluent may refer to untreated wastewater--or it may mean wastewater that has been treated and is available for various uses. To avoid ambiguity the term "reclaimed water" will be used when referring to water resources derived from treated effluent.)en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWater Resources Research Center, College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://wrrc.arizona.edu/publications/arroyoen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceWater Resources Research Center. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Research -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectArid regions -- Research -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater-supply -- Arizona.en_US
dc.titleArroyo Vol. 2 No. 3 (October 1988)en_US
dc.title.alternativeReclaimed Water, A Developing Resource To Help Meet State Water Needsen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Water Resources Research Center collection. For more information, please contact the Center, (520) 621-9591 or see http://wrrc.arizona.edu.en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.