Brackish Water as a Factor in Development of the Safford Valley, Arizona, U.S.A.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/314456
Title:
Brackish Water as a Factor in Development of the Safford Valley, Arizona, U.S.A.
Author:
Resnick, Sol D.; DeCook, K. J.
Affiliation:
Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona; Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
Jan-1975
Description:
For presentation at the International Symposium on Brackish Water as a Factor in Development, by the Desert Research Institute at Sede-Boqer at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel, January 5-10, 1975.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/314456
Abstract:
Introduction: The Safford Valley area lies along the Gila River in the southeastern part of the State of Arizona. The portion of the valley being considered, see Figure 1, is an intermontane trough averaging about 15 miles (24.2 kilometers) in width and about 30 miles (48.3 kilometers) in length. The cultivated lands lie along the Gila River and are 0.5 to 3.5 miles (0.8 to 5.6 kilometers) from the river. The approximately 14,000 inhabitants of the valley are primarily located in the municipalities, and Safford, the largest of the towns, was founded in 1875. Agriculture and agriculture-dependent activities, however, provide the mainstay of the Safford Valley economy accounting for approximately 63 percent of the export employment (State of Arizona, 1971). Like many valleys in arid regions, the Safford Valley, because of an inadequate supply of good quality water, has been forced to depend on ground water of notoriously poor quality. The purpose of this paper is to show how the limitation of available good quality water and the need to use brackish water affects agricultural practices and industrial development in the Safford Valley.
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Brackish waters -- Arizona.; Arid regions agriculture -- Arizona.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorResnick, Sol D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDeCook, K. J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-21T22:54:55Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-21T22:54:55Z-
dc.date.issued1975-01-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/314456-
dc.descriptionFor presentation at the International Symposium on Brackish Water as a Factor in Development, by the Desert Research Institute at Sede-Boqer at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel, January 5-10, 1975.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The Safford Valley area lies along the Gila River in the southeastern part of the State of Arizona. The portion of the valley being considered, see Figure 1, is an intermontane trough averaging about 15 miles (24.2 kilometers) in width and about 30 miles (48.3 kilometers) in length. The cultivated lands lie along the Gila River and are 0.5 to 3.5 miles (0.8 to 5.6 kilometers) from the river. The approximately 14,000 inhabitants of the valley are primarily located in the municipalities, and Safford, the largest of the towns, was founded in 1875. Agriculture and agriculture-dependent activities, however, provide the mainstay of the Safford Valley economy accounting for approximately 63 percent of the export employment (State of Arizona, 1971). Like many valleys in arid regions, the Safford Valley, because of an inadequate supply of good quality water, has been forced to depend on ground water of notoriously poor quality. The purpose of this paper is to show how the limitation of available good quality water and the need to use brackish water affects agricultural practices and industrial development in the Safford Valley.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.sourceWater Resources Research Center. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectBrackish waters -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectArid regions agriculture -- Arizona.en_US
dc.titleBrackish Water as a Factor in Development of the Safford Valley, Arizona, U.S.A.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Research Center, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Research Center, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Water Resources Research Center collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Water Resources Research Center at The University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the Center, (520) 621-9591 or see http://wrrc.arizona.edu.en_US
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