The Use of the Compartmented Reservoir in Water Harvesting Agrisystems

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/314429
Title:
The Use of the Compartmented Reservoir in Water Harvesting Agrisystems
Author:
Cluff, C. Brent
Affiliation:
Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona
Publisher:
International Center for Arid and Semi-Arid Land Studies, Texas Tech University
Journal:
Arid Lands Plant Resources: Proceedings of the International Arid Lands Conference on Plant Resources, Texas Tech University
Issue Date:
Jul-1979
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/314429
Abstract:
Runoff farming under most climatic conditions and soil types requires some type of efficient surface water storage in order to maintain production during dry years. The combination of a treated catchment feeding runoff water to a planted area coupled with surface storage is defined as a water harvesting agrisystem. Surface storage in order to be efficient requires evaporation control and in most cases seepage control. Various methods are available for economical seepage control but the cost of the currently used evaporation control methods are high enough to preclude their use for growing conventional crops using water harvesting agrisystems. A promising solution is the use of the compartmented reservoir to reduce evaporation loss. This method utilizes systematic pumping and removal of water from storage to keep water concentrated in the smallest number of compartments built within the typical shallow reservoir. The paper discusses the construction and design of several of these systems. It describes the use of the Compartmented Reservoir Optimization Program (CROP-76) developed in 1976 and improved in 1978 (CROP-78).
Language:
en_US

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCluff, C. Brenten_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-21T21:31:41Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-21T21:31:41Z-
dc.date.issued1979-07-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/314429-
dc.description.abstractRunoff farming under most climatic conditions and soil types requires some type of efficient surface water storage in order to maintain production during dry years. The combination of a treated catchment feeding runoff water to a planted area coupled with surface storage is defined as a water harvesting agrisystem. Surface storage in order to be efficient requires evaporation control and in most cases seepage control. Various methods are available for economical seepage control but the cost of the currently used evaporation control methods are high enough to preclude their use for growing conventional crops using water harvesting agrisystems. A promising solution is the use of the compartmented reservoir to reduce evaporation loss. This method utilizes systematic pumping and removal of water from storage to keep water concentrated in the smallest number of compartments built within the typical shallow reservoir. The paper discusses the construction and design of several of these systems. It describes the use of the Compartmented Reservoir Optimization Program (CROP-76) developed in 1976 and improved in 1978 (CROP-78).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherInternational Center for Arid and Semi-Arid Land Studies, Texas Tech Universityen_US
dc.sourceWater Resources Research Center. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titleThe Use of the Compartmented Reservoir in Water Harvesting Agrisystemsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Research Center, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalArid Lands Plant Resources: Proceedings of the International Arid Lands Conference on Plant Resources, Texas Tech Universityen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Water Resources Research Center collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Water Resources Research Center at The University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the Center, (520) 621-9591 or see http://wrrc.arizona.edu.en_US
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