Lyrical Fictions: Material Voice and Cultural Continuance in Cormac McCarthy, Zora Neale Hurston and Ray Young Bear

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/314136
Title:
Lyrical Fictions: Material Voice and Cultural Continuance in Cormac McCarthy, Zora Neale Hurston and Ray Young Bear
Author:
DuMont, Andrew Reilly
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Dissertation not available
Abstract:
This project is concerned with the role of the storyteller in the production and maintenance of human community. Starting with Roland Barthes's critique of romantic and modernist authorship in "The Death of the Author," I trace the parallels between literary and political authority in the globalized modern world, and ask if they mean that a revision of the author opens space for the reimagination of political community. To answer this question, I draw on recent discussions of cross-cultural comparison and theories of oral tradition to redefine literary voice and its relationship to modern textual authority. I then refer to the distinct cultural traditions that inform McCarthy, Hurston, and Young Bear to understand each author's focus on the material aspects of human speech, such as breath. The emphasis on these aspects of voice changes its use from a way to claim metaphysical certainty and political authority into a means for physical interaction that founds community in mutual vulnerability. The individual author thus becomes a participant in conversation, rather than one who intuits truth from the margins of human society, and the storyteller or political leader is able to take part in but not define the continuance of a given community. In making this argument, I use a study of poetics to ask students and teachers of modern American literatures to see the field as a site for the ongoing legislation of American community and identity, and suggest a method for engaging in comparative analyses that allows for the distinctiveness of different literary and cultural traditions while appreciating the possibilities in their resonating responses to the modern world.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Authority; Authorship; Biopolitics; Continuance; Voice; English; Apostrophe
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Evers, Lawrence

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleLyrical Fictions: Material Voice and Cultural Continuance in Cormac McCarthy, Zora Neale Hurston and Ray Young Bearen_US
dc.creatorDuMont, Andrew Reillyen_US
dc.contributor.authorDuMont, Andrew Reillyen_US
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseDissertation not availableen_US
dc.description.abstractThis project is concerned with the role of the storyteller in the production and maintenance of human community. Starting with Roland Barthes's critique of romantic and modernist authorship in "The Death of the Author," I trace the parallels between literary and political authority in the globalized modern world, and ask if they mean that a revision of the author opens space for the reimagination of political community. To answer this question, I draw on recent discussions of cross-cultural comparison and theories of oral tradition to redefine literary voice and its relationship to modern textual authority. I then refer to the distinct cultural traditions that inform McCarthy, Hurston, and Young Bear to understand each author's focus on the material aspects of human speech, such as breath. The emphasis on these aspects of voice changes its use from a way to claim metaphysical certainty and political authority into a means for physical interaction that founds community in mutual vulnerability. The individual author thus becomes a participant in conversation, rather than one who intuits truth from the margins of human society, and the storyteller or political leader is able to take part in but not define the continuance of a given community. In making this argument, I use a study of poetics to ask students and teachers of modern American literatures to see the field as a site for the ongoing legislation of American community and identity, and suggest a method for engaging in comparative analyses that allows for the distinctiveness of different literary and cultural traditions while appreciating the possibilities in their resonating responses to the modern world.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectAuthorityen_US
dc.subjectAuthorshipen_US
dc.subjectBiopoliticsen_US
dc.subjectContinuanceen_US
dc.subjectVoiceen_US
dc.subjectEnglishen_US
dc.subjectApostropheen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEvers, Lawrenceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEvers, Lawrenceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDryden, Edgaren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScruggs, Charlesen_US
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