Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/312548
Title:
The Single-Track Three Legged Mobile Robot
Author:
Goulding, John
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Unstable legged robots fall over without active stabilization, typically by repositioning the feet to maintain/regain stability of balance. This dissertation concerns the development of a Single-Track Three Legged Mobile Robot (ST3LMR) and control system. A proof-of-concept was demonstrated through digital simulation and experimentation with physical prototypes. The ST3LMR comprises a body and three articulated legs arranged in a narrow profile, one behind the other, to walk and maneuver along narrow trails and paths. The ST3LMR walks by placing successive footfalls in a generally single-track or in-line fashion. It achieves the form and function of a motorcycle but with the added benefit of legs and robotic control. That is, the feet are stationary with respect to footholds during the support period, thus eliminating the drawback of wheels, which require continuous support (especially when used in rugged terrain). By always having at least two feet on the ground, the ST3LMR is inherently stable in the pitch axis (in the forward/backward direction of motion), which allows for decoupling stability of balance control to only the roll axis (in the left/right direction).Suggested by recent developments in high-performance computing, walking robot locomotion and stabilization is considered from a new perspective, that of the Monte Carlo (MC) method. A high-speed MC simulation is used in a model-predictive control system to determine footholds that provide stability of balance. Stability of balance, maneuverability, and control is demonstrated through experimental results from physical prototypes and a simple digital simulation of an impulse response, avoidance maneuver, and leaning-into-the-turn maneuver.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Draisine; Legged; Model-Predictive; Robot; Single-Track; Electrical & Computer Engineering; Balance
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Electrical & Computer Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tharp, Hal S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Single-Track Three Legged Mobile Roboten_US
dc.creatorGoulding, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorGoulding, Johnen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractUnstable legged robots fall over without active stabilization, typically by repositioning the feet to maintain/regain stability of balance. This dissertation concerns the development of a Single-Track Three Legged Mobile Robot (ST3LMR) and control system. A proof-of-concept was demonstrated through digital simulation and experimentation with physical prototypes. The ST3LMR comprises a body and three articulated legs arranged in a narrow profile, one behind the other, to walk and maneuver along narrow trails and paths. The ST3LMR walks by placing successive footfalls in a generally single-track or in-line fashion. It achieves the form and function of a motorcycle but with the added benefit of legs and robotic control. That is, the feet are stationary with respect to footholds during the support period, thus eliminating the drawback of wheels, which require continuous support (especially when used in rugged terrain). By always having at least two feet on the ground, the ST3LMR is inherently stable in the pitch axis (in the forward/backward direction of motion), which allows for decoupling stability of balance control to only the roll axis (in the left/right direction).Suggested by recent developments in high-performance computing, walking robot locomotion and stabilization is considered from a new perspective, that of the Monte Carlo (MC) method. A high-speed MC simulation is used in a model-predictive control system to determine footholds that provide stability of balance. Stability of balance, maneuverability, and control is demonstrated through experimental results from physical prototypes and a simple digital simulation of an impulse response, avoidance maneuver, and leaning-into-the-turn maneuver.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectDraisineen_US
dc.subjectLeggeden_US
dc.subjectModel-Predictiveen_US
dc.subjectRoboten_US
dc.subjectSingle-Tracken_US
dc.subjectElectrical & Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectBalanceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical & Computer Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTharp, Hal S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTharp, Hal S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRozenblit, Jerzy W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSprinkle, Jonathanen_US
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