Afghan Women and the Problematics of Self Expression: Silencing Sounds and Sounds of Silence

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/312528
Title:
Afghan Women and the Problematics of Self Expression: Silencing Sounds and Sounds of Silence
Author:
Johnson, Fevziye
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Dissertation not available (per author's request)
Abstract:
This two-fold study examines the status of women of Afghanistan and the reality of their lives as depicted in their Persian-Dari literature and a few of their autobiographies published in English. It presents several relevant objectives: first, it argues that the highly traditional interpretations of Islam and Islamic law by certain religious authorities in the multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, multi-cultural, and semi-tribal society of Afghanistan, combined with some strong patriarchal system of the states, are the main factors imposing silence on the female population of that country. Second, to enhance this argument, the study provides a brief historical overview, with focus on women's status in Afghanistan since 1919 up to the present. Third, and most pertinent to the main subject of this project, the dissertation substantiates the above arguments by examining the portrayal of sexism, subjugation, segregation, resistance, veiling, and the overall oppression of Afghan women in women's prose, poetry, and autobiographical writings (the latter naturally have been published abroad). Finally, it argues that the absence of a strong Afghan female voice from any global dialog, along with the scarcity of academic study regarding their real status, have opened the way for a number of feminist writers and scholars to approach women's issues in Afghanistan from different perspectives that, in some cases, omit factual and realistic assessments of women's situation in that country. Documentary evidence is integrated into this study to demonstrate the courage, and the gradual awakening of Afghan women to their identity and power in the very complex society of Afghanistan, as well as their growing awareness that having a voice is vital for their survival.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Near Eastern Studies
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Near Eastern Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Talattof, Kamran

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAfghan Women and the Problematics of Self Expression: Silencing Sounds and Sounds of Silenceen_US
dc.creatorJohnson, Fevziyeen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Fevziyeen_US
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseDissertation not available (per author's request)en_US
dc.description.abstractThis two-fold study examines the status of women of Afghanistan and the reality of their lives as depicted in their Persian-Dari literature and a few of their autobiographies published in English. It presents several relevant objectives: first, it argues that the highly traditional interpretations of Islam and Islamic law by certain religious authorities in the multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, multi-cultural, and semi-tribal society of Afghanistan, combined with some strong patriarchal system of the states, are the main factors imposing silence on the female population of that country. Second, to enhance this argument, the study provides a brief historical overview, with focus on women's status in Afghanistan since 1919 up to the present. Third, and most pertinent to the main subject of this project, the dissertation substantiates the above arguments by examining the portrayal of sexism, subjugation, segregation, resistance, veiling, and the overall oppression of Afghan women in women's prose, poetry, and autobiographical writings (the latter naturally have been published abroad). Finally, it argues that the absence of a strong Afghan female voice from any global dialog, along with the scarcity of academic study regarding their real status, have opened the way for a number of feminist writers and scholars to approach women's issues in Afghanistan from different perspectives that, in some cases, omit factual and realistic assessments of women's situation in that country. Documentary evidence is integrated into this study to demonstrate the courage, and the gradual awakening of Afghan women to their identity and power in the very complex society of Afghanistan, as well as their growing awareness that having a voice is vital for their survival.en_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTalattof, Kamranen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTalattof, Kamranen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHudson, Leilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBetteridge, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNoorani, Yaseenen_US
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