Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311985
Title:
An Arizona Guide to Water Quality and Uses
Author:
Artiola, Janick F.; Hix, Gary; Gerba, Charles; Riley, James J.
Affiliation:
Department of Soil, Water & Environmental Science; Arizona Water Well Association; Department of Soil, Water & Environmental Science; Department of Soil, Water & Environmental Science
Publisher:
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
Jan-2014
Description:
10 pp.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311985
Abstract:
Introduction: Adult human beings may drink up to two liters/day (approx. two quarts/day) of fresh water to stay alive. However, we can consume up to two quarts/hour of water, depending on the level of activity, ambient temperature, and humidity conditions (Born 2013). We also need fresh water to cook with and to clean ourselves. About 40% of our food production depends on irrigation (UN Water 2013) using water with low salinity and other contaminants. Climate scientists project increasing temperatures and possibly less rainfall in the Southwest now and into the near future, see Extension Publication #AZ1458 (Artiola et al. 2008). Thus, climate change is likely to stress the limited water resources of Arizona and affect water quality by concentrating contaminants and stressing water-dependent environments. This publication presents brief summaries of the types of water sources, their water quality, and possible uses in Arizona. Since the types and amounts of constituents found in water, whether nutrients, pathogens, contaminants or pollutants, help determine its possible uses, it is necessary to measure water quality to determine treatment options for a given use. To assist in this task, we present a triangle-shaped diagram (Figure 8) which divides water quality into three major groups: Pathogens, Salinity, and Specific Contaminants, placing major water sources in relation to the three groups. Home and well owners can use this diagram as a general aid to evaluate various sources of water, determine their likely water quality, and identify appropriate uses for them.
Type:
text; Pamphlet
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Water; Quality; Contaminants; Pathogens; Salinity; Pollutants; Uses; Groundwater; Surface; Gray
Series/Report no.:
University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ1610

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorArtiola, Janick F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHix, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGerba, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.authorRiley, James J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-28T19:38:56Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-28T19:38:56Z-
dc.date.issued2014-01-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/311985-
dc.description10 pp.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Adult human beings may drink up to two liters/day (approx. two quarts/day) of fresh water to stay alive. However, we can consume up to two quarts/hour of water, depending on the level of activity, ambient temperature, and humidity conditions (Born 2013). We also need fresh water to cook with and to clean ourselves. About 40% of our food production depends on irrigation (UN Water 2013) using water with low salinity and other contaminants. Climate scientists project increasing temperatures and possibly less rainfall in the Southwest now and into the near future, see Extension Publication #AZ1458 (Artiola et al. 2008). Thus, climate change is likely to stress the limited water resources of Arizona and affect water quality by concentrating contaminants and stressing water-dependent environments. This publication presents brief summaries of the types of water sources, their water quality, and possible uses in Arizona. Since the types and amounts of constituents found in water, whether nutrients, pathogens, contaminants or pollutants, help determine its possible uses, it is necessary to measure water quality to determine treatment options for a given use. To assist in this task, we present a triangle-shaped diagram (Figure 8) which divides water quality into three major groups: Pathogens, Salinity, and Specific Contaminants, placing major water sources in relation to the three groups. Home and well owners can use this diagram as a general aid to evaluate various sources of water, determine their likely water quality, and identify appropriate uses for them.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUniversity of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ1610en_US
dc.subjectWateren_US
dc.subjectQualityen_US
dc.subjectContaminantsen_US
dc.subjectPathogensen_US
dc.subjectSalinityen_US
dc.subjectPollutantsen_US
dc.subjectUsesen_US
dc.subjectGroundwateren_US
dc.subjectSurfaceen_US
dc.subjectGrayen_US
dc.titleAn Arizona Guide to Water Quality and Usesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typePamphleten_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Soil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.departmentArizona Water Well Associationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Soil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Soil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.calsAZ1610-2014-
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