Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311744
Title:
Arapaho Accent
Author:
Fountain, Amy
Affiliation:
Department of Linguistics, The University of Arizona
Publisher:
University of Arizona Linguistics Circle
Journal:
Coyote Papers: Working Papers in Linguistics from A-Z
Issue Date:
1995
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311744
Abstract:
Introduction: Arapaho is an Algonquian language spoken by a population of about 3500 in Wyoming and Oklahoma (Salzmann 1983). The accent system of Arapaho is quite complex and presents a challenge to any theory of stress/accent which attempts to account for these phenomena in a derivational manner (Salzmann 1965, Tsay 1989). In this essay it is argued that Arapaho accent involves both lexical and derivational aspects. In section 2, the phonetic characteristics of Arapaho accent are outlined. Section 3 briefly overviews Idsardi's (1992) theory of the computation of stress. In section 4, the Arapaho data are presented and the crucial generalizations are stated. Section 5 contains an analysis of these facts, utilizing Idcardi's theory. An alternative analysis is offered in section 6, and finally in section 7 the theoretical implications of the Arapaho facts are discussed.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
ISSN:
0894-4539

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFountain, Amyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-23T19:50:40Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-23T19:50:40Z-
dc.date.issued1995-
dc.identifier.issn0894-4539-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/311744-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Arapaho is an Algonquian language spoken by a population of about 3500 in Wyoming and Oklahoma (Salzmann 1983). The accent system of Arapaho is quite complex and presents a challenge to any theory of stress/accent which attempts to account for these phenomena in a derivational manner (Salzmann 1965, Tsay 1989). In this essay it is argued that Arapaho accent involves both lexical and derivational aspects. In section 2, the phonetic characteristics of Arapaho accent are outlined. Section 3 briefly overviews Idsardi's (1992) theory of the computation of stress. In section 4, the Arapaho data are presented and the crucial generalizations are stated. Section 5 contains an analysis of these facts, utilizing Idcardi's theory. An alternative analysis is offered in section 6, and finally in section 7 the theoretical implications of the Arapaho facts are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona Linguistics Circleen_US
dc.titleArapaho Accenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Linguistics, The University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalCoyote Papers: Working Papers in Linguistics from A-Zen_US
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