A Spatial Analysis and Zooarchaeological Interpretation of Archaeological Bison Remains in the Southwest and the Wildlife Management Implications for the House Rock Valley Bison Herd in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311670
Title:
A Spatial Analysis and Zooarchaeological Interpretation of Archaeological Bison Remains in the Southwest and the Wildlife Management Implications for the House Rock Valley Bison Herd in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
Author:
Huffer, Donelle Joy
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The historically introduced House Rock Valley bison herd has, in recent years, migrated from the eastern Arizona Strip onto the Kaibab Plateau within Grand Canyon National Park. Bison are considered a nonnative species to the southern Colorado Plateau, and the animals adversely impact sensitive ecosystems prompting National Park Service wildlife managers to pursue their removal. Archaeofaunal evidence of bison in the Grand Canyon and neighboring regions, however, raises concern that bison may in fact be native. Assessing the evidence within a zooarchaeological interpretive framework is critical since mere presence/absence lists of bison remains do not address the potentially complex cultural processes involved in the formation of archaeofaunal assemblages. Inter-assemblage comparisons illustrate a decline in relative abundance and skeletal completeness correlated to distance from traditionally understood historical bison distribution. If bison were present in the Southwest, as the evidence suggests, they likely entered the region only occasionally as small, dispersed herds.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Bison; Colorado Plateau; Grand Canyon; Invasive Species; Wildlife Management; Anthropology; Applied Zooarchaeology
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pavao-Zuckerman, Barnet
Committee Chair:
Pavao-Zuckerman, Barnet

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA Spatial Analysis and Zooarchaeological Interpretation of Archaeological Bison Remains in the Southwest and the Wildlife Management Implications for the House Rock Valley Bison Herd in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorHuffer, Donelle Joyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuffer, Donelle Joyen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe historically introduced House Rock Valley bison herd has, in recent years, migrated from the eastern Arizona Strip onto the Kaibab Plateau within Grand Canyon National Park. Bison are considered a nonnative species to the southern Colorado Plateau, and the animals adversely impact sensitive ecosystems prompting National Park Service wildlife managers to pursue their removal. Archaeofaunal evidence of bison in the Grand Canyon and neighboring regions, however, raises concern that bison may in fact be native. Assessing the evidence within a zooarchaeological interpretive framework is critical since mere presence/absence lists of bison remains do not address the potentially complex cultural processes involved in the formation of archaeofaunal assemblages. Inter-assemblage comparisons illustrate a decline in relative abundance and skeletal completeness correlated to distance from traditionally understood historical bison distribution. If bison were present in the Southwest, as the evidence suggests, they likely entered the region only occasionally as small, dispersed herds.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectBisonen_US
dc.subjectColorado Plateauen_US
dc.subjectGrand Canyonen_US
dc.subjectInvasive Speciesen_US
dc.subjectWildlife Managementen_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectApplied Zooarchaeologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPavao-Zuckerman, Barneten_US
dc.contributor.chairPavao-Zuckerman, Barneten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStiner, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKoprowski, Johnen_US
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