(Re)Creating a Hero's Narrative through Music: Different Musical Landscapes in Six Live Action Batman Films

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311589
Title:
(Re)Creating a Hero's Narrative through Music: Different Musical Landscapes in Six Live Action Batman Films
Author:
Solis, Israel
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation uses an interdisciplinary approach that analyzes and compares the film scoring processes of Danny Elfman, Elliot Goldenthal, James Newton Howard and Hans Zimmer in characterizing the fictional hero Batman in film. This is accomplished by applying Classical Hollywood film scoring principles from the golden age of cinema, Juan Chattah's pragmatic and semiotic typologies regarding musical metaphoric expression, and psychology. This amalgamation demonstrates how the aforementioned film composers consider varying structural aspects of their music, i.e., formal design, melodic contour, harmonic gestures, and cadential formulas, in (re)creating and establishing their individual artistic trademarks on a comic book character within canonical and non-canonical storylines. The study includes soundtracks from Tim Burton's Batman and Batman Returns, Joel Schumacher's Batman Forever and Batman & Robin, and Christopher Nolan's Batman Begins and The Dark Knight. The result is an analysis that: 1) enhances what little is known about the music for these films; 2) allows for the recognition of the film scoring creative process behind film sequelization; 3) enhances musical and psychological interpretations of the Batman character; and 4) offers an expansion of Chattah's metaphorical typologies.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Chattah; Film; Gorbman; Interdisciplinary; Psychology; Music; Batman
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Traut, Donald G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.title(Re)Creating a Hero's Narrative through Music: Different Musical Landscapes in Six Live Action Batman Filmsen_US
dc.creatorSolis, Israelen_US
dc.contributor.authorSolis, Israelen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation uses an interdisciplinary approach that analyzes and compares the film scoring processes of Danny Elfman, Elliot Goldenthal, James Newton Howard and Hans Zimmer in characterizing the fictional hero Batman in film. This is accomplished by applying Classical Hollywood film scoring principles from the golden age of cinema, Juan Chattah's pragmatic and semiotic typologies regarding musical metaphoric expression, and psychology. This amalgamation demonstrates how the aforementioned film composers consider varying structural aspects of their music, i.e., formal design, melodic contour, harmonic gestures, and cadential formulas, in (re)creating and establishing their individual artistic trademarks on a comic book character within canonical and non-canonical storylines. The study includes soundtracks from Tim Burton's Batman and Batman Returns, Joel Schumacher's Batman Forever and Batman & Robin, and Christopher Nolan's Batman Begins and The Dark Knight. The result is an analysis that: 1) enhances what little is known about the music for these films; 2) allows for the recognition of the film scoring creative process behind film sequelization; 3) enhances musical and psychological interpretations of the Batman character; and 4) offers an expansion of Chattah's metaphorical typologies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectChattahen_US
dc.subjectFilmen_US
dc.subjectGorbmanen_US
dc.subjectInterdisciplinaryen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectMusicen_US
dc.subjectBatmanen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTraut, Donald G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTraut, Donald G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPomeroy, David B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWalsh, Craig T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSturman, Janet L.en_US
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