Implementing an Online Education and Reminder System to Aid a Clinic's Dietary Intervention Program

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311578
Title:
Implementing an Online Education and Reminder System to Aid a Clinic's Dietary Intervention Program
Author:
Devika, Janae Alyna
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Obesity and diet-associated chronic illnesses are a major burden on the health of the U.S. population. Healthcare providers are challenged with the treatment of patients with chronic illness but are not equipped to manage and influence patient lifestyle choices. Effective, long-term behavior change using interventions such as a dietary program can be costly and time consuming. Pioneer Comprehensive Medical (PCM) is a small clinic located in Draper, Utah that uses a dietary intervention program to improve patient health, but program application is inconsistent, patients feel ill equipped to make changes, and attrition is high. Like many small clinics, PCM has limited resources to adopt new policies and programs. This practice inquiry (PI) proposes to address this practice gap with behavior change theory as a foundation (Chapter 1) and improving the program at PCM with a quality improvement (QI) process using a Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) model. In the "Plan" phase (Chapter 2), a systematic review of the research literature determined the key components for effective dietary interventions. Six characteristic features found in these interventions include: self-efficacy building education, web-based delivery, sequential delivery of information, consistent messaging with reminders, a supportive social environment and individually-tailored feedback. The "Do" phase (Chapter 3) is the design of a program delivery method that incorporates the findings from the literature. The "Study" phase (Chapter 4) is the design of a pilot study to assess the usability, feasibility, and sustainability of the program. The "Act" phase (Chapter 5) is the implementation plan for all PCM patients based on findings in the pilot study and to assess the impact of the program. This final phase will provide detailed data to assess the short, intermediate, and long-term outcomes of the program.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Diet; Education; Electronic; Nutrition; Nursing; Delivery
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Koithan, Mary S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleImplementing an Online Education and Reminder System to Aid a Clinic's Dietary Intervention Programen_US
dc.creatorDevika, Janae Alynaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDevika, Janae Alynaen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractObesity and diet-associated chronic illnesses are a major burden on the health of the U.S. population. Healthcare providers are challenged with the treatment of patients with chronic illness but are not equipped to manage and influence patient lifestyle choices. Effective, long-term behavior change using interventions such as a dietary program can be costly and time consuming. Pioneer Comprehensive Medical (PCM) is a small clinic located in Draper, Utah that uses a dietary intervention program to improve patient health, but program application is inconsistent, patients feel ill equipped to make changes, and attrition is high. Like many small clinics, PCM has limited resources to adopt new policies and programs. This practice inquiry (PI) proposes to address this practice gap with behavior change theory as a foundation (Chapter 1) and improving the program at PCM with a quality improvement (QI) process using a Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) model. In the "Plan" phase (Chapter 2), a systematic review of the research literature determined the key components for effective dietary interventions. Six characteristic features found in these interventions include: self-efficacy building education, web-based delivery, sequential delivery of information, consistent messaging with reminders, a supportive social environment and individually-tailored feedback. The "Do" phase (Chapter 3) is the design of a program delivery method that incorporates the findings from the literature. The "Study" phase (Chapter 4) is the design of a pilot study to assess the usability, feasibility, and sustainability of the program. The "Act" phase (Chapter 5) is the implementation plan for all PCM patients based on findings in the pilot study and to assess the impact of the program. This final phase will provide detailed data to assess the short, intermediate, and long-term outcomes of the program.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectDieten_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectElectronicen_US
dc.subjectNutritionen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.subjectDeliveryen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKoithan, Mary S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKoithan, Mary S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, Elaine G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAnderson, Sue A.en_US
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