Participant Roles in Aggression: Analysis of the Overt and Relational Aggression Participant Role Scales with Confirmatory Factor Analysis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311568
Title:
Participant Roles in Aggression: Analysis of the Overt and Relational Aggression Participant Role Scales with Confirmatory Factor Analysis
Author:
Casper, Deborah M.
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The peer group is a dynamic context within which children and adolescents have a wide range of experiences, both positive and negative. Friendships provide support and a sense of belonging; however, friendships can also be contexts within which competition and aggression occur. During childhood and adolescence, aggression and victimization are likely to occur in the school context and in situations where several members of the peer group are present and sometimes actively (or passively) participating. In the seminal work related to bullying as a group process, Salmivalli and colleagues identified distinct roles that children take when enacting aggression (Salmivalli et al., 1996). Salmivalli's work, in the area of participant roles, however, has focused on overt bullying, a specific subtype of aggression which has a specific meaning within the peer relations literature. To date, the participant roles have not been measured within the context of overt and relational aggression. The purpose of the present study is to examine the psychometric properties of the Overt Aggression Participant Role Scale (OAPRS) and the Relational Aggression Participant Role Scale (RAPRS), two new scales designed by the author, to measure the aggressor, assistant, reinforcer, defender, outsider, and victim roles during acts aggression, as opposed to bullying. Additional goals include: 1) exploring the associations among the roles, 2) examining measurement equivalence across gender and grade level, and 3) exploring associations of the participant roles with measures of sociometric status and depressive symptoms. Findings point toward the psychometric properties of the two scales being quite robust. The data fit the 12 factor model and the scales measure the constructs equivalently across gender and three grade groups. The aggressor, assistant, and reinforcer roles were strongly associated as were the aggressor and victim roles. Several relational roles were highly overlapping, suggesting reciprocity of roles. Few meaningful gender or grade level differences were found resulting in more similarity in the overt and relational roles than differences. The outsider role was the only role not associated with depressive symptoms. Implications for prevention and intervention are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Overt Aggression; Participant Roles; Relational Aggression; Scale Analysis; Family & Consumer Sciences; Confirmatory Factor Analysis
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family & Consumer Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Card, Noel A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleParticipant Roles in Aggression: Analysis of the Overt and Relational Aggression Participant Role Scales with Confirmatory Factor Analysisen_US
dc.creatorCasper, Deborah M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCasper, Deborah M.en_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe peer group is a dynamic context within which children and adolescents have a wide range of experiences, both positive and negative. Friendships provide support and a sense of belonging; however, friendships can also be contexts within which competition and aggression occur. During childhood and adolescence, aggression and victimization are likely to occur in the school context and in situations where several members of the peer group are present and sometimes actively (or passively) participating. In the seminal work related to bullying as a group process, Salmivalli and colleagues identified distinct roles that children take when enacting aggression (Salmivalli et al., 1996). Salmivalli's work, in the area of participant roles, however, has focused on overt bullying, a specific subtype of aggression which has a specific meaning within the peer relations literature. To date, the participant roles have not been measured within the context of overt and relational aggression. The purpose of the present study is to examine the psychometric properties of the Overt Aggression Participant Role Scale (OAPRS) and the Relational Aggression Participant Role Scale (RAPRS), two new scales designed by the author, to measure the aggressor, assistant, reinforcer, defender, outsider, and victim roles during acts aggression, as opposed to bullying. Additional goals include: 1) exploring the associations among the roles, 2) examining measurement equivalence across gender and grade level, and 3) exploring associations of the participant roles with measures of sociometric status and depressive symptoms. Findings point toward the psychometric properties of the two scales being quite robust. The data fit the 12 factor model and the scales measure the constructs equivalently across gender and three grade groups. The aggressor, assistant, and reinforcer roles were strongly associated as were the aggressor and victim roles. Several relational roles were highly overlapping, suggesting reciprocity of roles. Few meaningful gender or grade level differences were found resulting in more similarity in the overt and relational roles than differences. The outsider role was the only role not associated with depressive symptoms. Implications for prevention and intervention are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectOvert Aggressionen_US
dc.subjectParticipant Rolesen_US
dc.subjectRelational Aggressionen_US
dc.subjectScale Analysisen_US
dc.subjectFamily & Consumer Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectConfirmatory Factor Analysisen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily & Consumer Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCard, Noel A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCard, Noel A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStephen, Russell T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBauman, Sheri A.en_US
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