Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311555
Title:
Coded-Aperture Compton Camera for Gamma-Ray Imaging
Author:
Farber, Aaron M.
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation describes the development of a novel gamma-ray imaging system concept and presents results from Monte Carlo simulations of the new design. Current designs for large field-of-view gamma cameras suitable for homeland security applications implement either a coded aperture or a Compton scattering geometry to image a gamma-ray source. Both of these systems require large, expensive position-sensitive detectors in order to work effectively. By combining characteristics of both of these systems, a new design can be implemented that does not require such expensive detectors and that can be scaled down to a portable size. This new system has significant promise in homeland security, astronomy, botany and other fields, while future iterations may prove useful in medical imaging, other biological sciences and other areas, such as non-destructive testing. A proof-of-principle study of the new gamma-ray imaging system has been performed by Monte Carlo simulation. Various reconstruction methods have been explored and compared. General-Purpose Graphics-Processor-Unit (GPGPU) computation has also been incorporated. The resulting code is a primary design tool for exploring variables such as detector spacing, material selection and thickness and pixel geometry. The advancement of the system from a simple 1-dimensional simulation to a full 3-dimensional model is described. Methods of image reconstruction are discussed and results of simulations consisting of both a 4 x 4 and a 16 x 16 object space mesh have been presented. A discussion of the limitations and potential areas of further study is also presented.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Compton; Gamma-ray imaging; remote sensing; Aerospace Engineering; Coded aperture
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Aerospace Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Williams, John G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCoded-Aperture Compton Camera for Gamma-Ray Imagingen_US
dc.creatorFarber, Aaron M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFarber, Aaron M.en_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation describes the development of a novel gamma-ray imaging system concept and presents results from Monte Carlo simulations of the new design. Current designs for large field-of-view gamma cameras suitable for homeland security applications implement either a coded aperture or a Compton scattering geometry to image a gamma-ray source. Both of these systems require large, expensive position-sensitive detectors in order to work effectively. By combining characteristics of both of these systems, a new design can be implemented that does not require such expensive detectors and that can be scaled down to a portable size. This new system has significant promise in homeland security, astronomy, botany and other fields, while future iterations may prove useful in medical imaging, other biological sciences and other areas, such as non-destructive testing. A proof-of-principle study of the new gamma-ray imaging system has been performed by Monte Carlo simulation. Various reconstruction methods have been explored and compared. General-Purpose Graphics-Processor-Unit (GPGPU) computation has also been incorporated. The resulting code is a primary design tool for exploring variables such as detector spacing, material selection and thickness and pixel geometry. The advancement of the system from a simple 1-dimensional simulation to a full 3-dimensional model is described. Methods of image reconstruction are discussed and results of simulations consisting of both a 4 x 4 and a 16 x 16 object space mesh have been presented. A discussion of the limitations and potential areas of further study is also presented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectComptonen_US
dc.subjectGamma-ray imagingen_US
dc.subjectremote sensingen_US
dc.subjectAerospace Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectCoded apertureen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, John G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilliams, John G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGanapol, Barryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFurenlid, Larsen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFurfaro, Robertoen_US
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