Indians Weaving in Cyberspace, Indigenous Urban Youth Cultures, Identities and Politics of Languages

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311535
Title:
Indians Weaving in Cyberspace, Indigenous Urban Youth Cultures, Identities and Politics of Languages
Author:
Jimenez Quispe, Luz
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study is aimed at analyzing how contemporary urban Aymara youth hip hoppers and bloggers are creating their identities and are producing discourses in texts and lyrics to contest racist and colonial discourses. The research is situated in Bolivia, which is currently engaged in a cultural and political revolution supported by Indigenous movements. Theoretically the study is framed by a multi-perspective conceptual framework based on subaltern studies, coloniality of power, coloniality of knowledge, interculturality and decolonial theory. Aymara young people illustrate the possibility of preserving Indigenous identities, language, and knowledge while maximizing the benefits of urban society. This challenges the colonial ideology that has essentialized the rural origin of Indigenous identities. Moreover, this research argues that the health of Indigenous languages is interconnected with the health of the self-esteem of Indigenous people. Additionally, this study provides information about the relation of youth to the power of oral tradition, language policies, and the use of technology.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Education; Indigenous Youth; Intercultural policies; Subaltern Studies; Technology; Language, Reading & Culture; Colonial ideology
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading & Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
González, Norma

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleIndians Weaving in Cyberspace, Indigenous Urban Youth Cultures, Identities and Politics of Languagesen_US
dc.creatorJimenez Quispe, Luzen_US
dc.contributor.authorJimenez Quispe, Luzen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study is aimed at analyzing how contemporary urban Aymara youth hip hoppers and bloggers are creating their identities and are producing discourses in texts and lyrics to contest racist and colonial discourses. The research is situated in Bolivia, which is currently engaged in a cultural and political revolution supported by Indigenous movements. Theoretically the study is framed by a multi-perspective conceptual framework based on subaltern studies, coloniality of power, coloniality of knowledge, interculturality and decolonial theory. Aymara young people illustrate the possibility of preserving Indigenous identities, language, and knowledge while maximizing the benefits of urban society. This challenges the colonial ideology that has essentialized the rural origin of Indigenous identities. Moreover, this research argues that the health of Indigenous languages is interconnected with the health of the self-esteem of Indigenous people. Additionally, this study provides information about the relation of youth to the power of oral tradition, language policies, and the use of technology.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous Youthen_US
dc.subjectIntercultural policiesen_US
dc.subjectSubaltern Studiesen_US
dc.subjectTechnologyen_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
dc.subjectColonial ideologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGonzález, Normaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGonzález, Normaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWyman, Leisyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCombs, Mary Carolen_US
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