The Process of Death Imminence Awareness by Family Members of Patients in Adult Critical Care

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311478
Title:
The Process of Death Imminence Awareness by Family Members of Patients in Adult Critical Care
Author:
Baumhover, Nancy Catherine
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Quality end-of-life care in the adult critical care remains a high priority for numerous professional agencies and organizations due to advanced technologies that sustain or extent life, regardless of life quality. The purpose of this study was to describe how family members of patients in adult critical care attain awareness that their loved one is dying or near death in the adult critical care setting. Two research questions were addressed: 1) What is the human-environment health process of knowing that end-of-life is imminent by family members of patients in the adult critical care area?, and 2) What factors influence the human-environment health process of knowing that end-of-life is imminent by family members in the adult critical care area? A Glaserian grounded theory design was utilized to conduct this retrospective study. Both primary (interviews) and secondary (poem, nursing art, song, media and film) data sources supported the emerging theory. The Process of Death Imminence Awareness by Family Members of Patients in Adult Critical Care contained six phases: Patient's Near Death Awareness, Dying Right in Front of Me, Turning Points in the Patient's Condition, No Longer the Person I Once Knew, Doing Right by Them, and Time to Let Go. Influencing factors associated with this process were discussed as process facilitators and hindrances. Supportive nursing behaviors and actions as well as family member's emotional, behavioral, and physical reactions to having a critically ill family member were also discussed. This substantive theory will guide nursing education, practice, and research in the creation of nursing interventions, instrumentation, protocols, and policies and procedures aimed at providing cost effective quality end-of-life care in this specialized area of care.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Death Imminence Awareness; End-of-Life; Grounded Theory; Nursing; Critical Care
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reed, Pamela G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe Process of Death Imminence Awareness by Family Members of Patients in Adult Critical Careen_US
dc.creatorBaumhover, Nancy Catherineen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaumhover, Nancy Catherineen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractQuality end-of-life care in the adult critical care remains a high priority for numerous professional agencies and organizations due to advanced technologies that sustain or extent life, regardless of life quality. The purpose of this study was to describe how family members of patients in adult critical care attain awareness that their loved one is dying or near death in the adult critical care setting. Two research questions were addressed: 1) What is the human-environment health process of knowing that end-of-life is imminent by family members of patients in the adult critical care area?, and 2) What factors influence the human-environment health process of knowing that end-of-life is imminent by family members in the adult critical care area? A Glaserian grounded theory design was utilized to conduct this retrospective study. Both primary (interviews) and secondary (poem, nursing art, song, media and film) data sources supported the emerging theory. The Process of Death Imminence Awareness by Family Members of Patients in Adult Critical Care contained six phases: Patient's Near Death Awareness, Dying Right in Front of Me, Turning Points in the Patient's Condition, No Longer the Person I Once Knew, Doing Right by Them, and Time to Let Go. Influencing factors associated with this process were discussed as process facilitators and hindrances. Supportive nursing behaviors and actions as well as family member's emotional, behavioral, and physical reactions to having a critically ill family member were also discussed. This substantive theory will guide nursing education, practice, and research in the creation of nursing interventions, instrumentation, protocols, and policies and procedures aimed at providing cost effective quality end-of-life care in this specialized area of care.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectDeath Imminence Awarenessen_US
dc.subjectEnd-of-Lifeen_US
dc.subjectGrounded Theoryen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.subjectCritical Careen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorReed, Pamela G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReed, Pamela G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCrist, Janice D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRishel, Cindy J.en_US
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