Health Beliefs Related to Physical Activity in Patients with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311469
Title:
Health Beliefs Related to Physical Activity in Patients with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators
Author:
Crawford, Rebecca Susan
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Low levels of physical activity (PA) are a significant predictor of early death among recipients of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Regular, moderate PA is associated with improved quality of life (QOL), reduced arrhythmia burden, and improved health outcomes in ICD recipients yet many do not engage in PA and the reasons for lack of engagement are unclear. The purpose of this descriptive, cross-sectional study was to examine health beliefs related to PA and QOL in adults living with ICDs. The Health Belief Model provided the theoretical framework for this study. A convenience sample of 107 adult, ICD recipients (26 females and 81 males) were recruited from five cardiology clinic settings within the same private practice. Seventy-seven percent completed the study tasks (N=81). Subjects completed a Demographic Data Questionnaire, Self-Efficacy Expectations after ICD Scale, Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale, Health Belief Questionnaire, Incidental and Planned Exercise Questionnaire and Quality of Life Medical Outcomes Survey-SF36®. Clinical data was collected from the medical record. Mean age of the subjects was 70.23 yrs. ± 11.76 yrs. The majority were male (71.6 percent) and 77.8 percent were White, non-Hispanic. Most were insured by Medicare (79 percent), were retired (50 percent) and reported incomes less than 20,000 dollars/year (39 percent). Over 98 percent were diagnosed with heart failure and almost 40 percent reported their physical activity had decreased since having an ICD implanted. There were no differences in health beliefs and QOL scores between subjects who had an ICD as a primary or secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Predictors of PA participation in this population were Self-Efficacy for Exercise (SEE) beliefs, Self-Efficacy ICD (SEICD) beliefs, age and NYHA Class. Almost 33 percent of variance in PA participation can be explained by SEE (b = 2.407, β = .390, t = 3.911, p<.01); SEICD (b =2.304, β = .215, t = 2.149, p<.05); age (b = -.394, β = -.234, t =-2.277, p<.05); and NYHA Class (b = -6.373, β =-.198, t = -1.998, p =<.05). Findings indicate the strength of self-confidence in influencing healthy behavior. Findings support the need for more research in identifying barriers and predictors of PA participation in adult, ICD recipients.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Heart Failure; Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator; Physical Activity; Quality of Life; Self-efficacy; Nursing; Health Beliefs
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Insel, Kathleen C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHealth Beliefs Related to Physical Activity in Patients with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillatorsen_US
dc.creatorCrawford, Rebecca Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Rebecca Susanen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractLow levels of physical activity (PA) are a significant predictor of early death among recipients of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Regular, moderate PA is associated with improved quality of life (QOL), reduced arrhythmia burden, and improved health outcomes in ICD recipients yet many do not engage in PA and the reasons for lack of engagement are unclear. The purpose of this descriptive, cross-sectional study was to examine health beliefs related to PA and QOL in adults living with ICDs. The Health Belief Model provided the theoretical framework for this study. A convenience sample of 107 adult, ICD recipients (26 females and 81 males) were recruited from five cardiology clinic settings within the same private practice. Seventy-seven percent completed the study tasks (N=81). Subjects completed a Demographic Data Questionnaire, Self-Efficacy Expectations after ICD Scale, Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale, Health Belief Questionnaire, Incidental and Planned Exercise Questionnaire and Quality of Life Medical Outcomes Survey-SF36®. Clinical data was collected from the medical record. Mean age of the subjects was 70.23 yrs. ± 11.76 yrs. The majority were male (71.6 percent) and 77.8 percent were White, non-Hispanic. Most were insured by Medicare (79 percent), were retired (50 percent) and reported incomes less than 20,000 dollars/year (39 percent). Over 98 percent were diagnosed with heart failure and almost 40 percent reported their physical activity had decreased since having an ICD implanted. There were no differences in health beliefs and QOL scores between subjects who had an ICD as a primary or secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Predictors of PA participation in this population were Self-Efficacy for Exercise (SEE) beliefs, Self-Efficacy ICD (SEICD) beliefs, age and NYHA Class. Almost 33 percent of variance in PA participation can be explained by SEE (b = 2.407, β = .390, t = 3.911, p<.01); SEICD (b =2.304, β = .215, t = 2.149, p<.05); age (b = -.394, β = -.234, t =-2.277, p<.05); and NYHA Class (b = -6.373, β =-.198, t = -1.998, p =<.05). Findings indicate the strength of self-confidence in influencing healthy behavior. Findings support the need for more research in identifying barriers and predictors of PA participation in adult, ICD recipients.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectHeart Failureen_US
dc.subjectImplantable Cardioverter Defibrillatoren_US
dc.subjectPhysical Activityen_US
dc.subjectQuality of Lifeen_US
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.subjectHealth Beliefsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorInsel, Kathleen C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberInsel, Kathleen C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReed, Pamela G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRosenfeld, Anne G.en_US
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