Academic Engagement of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in a Co-Enrollment Program

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311449
Title:
Academic Engagement of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in a Co-Enrollment Program
Author:
Metz, Kelly Kathleen
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this observational study the researcher examined the Academic Engagement of deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH) students in a co-enrollment setting. Academic Engagement refers to attention, class participation, and time-on-task. Co-Enrollment is a model of group inclusion that provides D/HH students with access to a D/HH peer group as well as access to the general education curriculum. D/HH students typically lag behind their hearing peers in achievement, due in part to difficulties with accessing the general education curriculum both in special schools for the Deaf or self-contained classrooms, as well as in traditional inclusive settings. One way to know if a student has actually had access to, rather than mere exposure to the curriculum is to determine if he has attended to the instruction and participated in the instructional activities. Co-enrollment programming holds promise for addressing the problems with access that D/HH students typically experience in other educational placements; therefore the researcher hypothesized that in this unique setting D/HH students would demonstrate levels of Academic Engagement equal to their hearing peers. The researcher further hypothesized that there would be a relationship between Academic Engagement and the classroom environment, and that this relationship would be similar for D/HH and hearing students. Using a correlational research design, these hypotheses were tested by conducting repeated observations with use of the Mainstream Version of the Code for Instructional Structure and Student Academic Response (MS-CISSAR) for measuring Academic Engagement. Results indicated that D/HH students in a co-enrollment setting were as Academically Engaged as their hearing peers; however they were less engaged in active forms of Academic Engagement (i.e., Academic Responding) than their hearing peers. Associations were found between aspects of Classroom Ecology, such as the size of Instructional Grouping, and the degree of Academic Engagement for both D/HH and hearing students. The associations between Academic Engagement and Classroom Ecology were similar for D/HH and hearing students; however some differences were found as well. The implications of these results are discussed and suggestions are made for future research.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
coenrollment; deaf; hard of hearing; hearing impaired; time on task; Special Education; academic engagement
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Antia, Shirin D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAcademic Engagement of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in a Co-Enrollment Programen_US
dc.creatorMetz, Kelly Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMetz, Kelly Kathleenen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this observational study the researcher examined the Academic Engagement of deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH) students in a co-enrollment setting. Academic Engagement refers to attention, class participation, and time-on-task. Co-Enrollment is a model of group inclusion that provides D/HH students with access to a D/HH peer group as well as access to the general education curriculum. D/HH students typically lag behind their hearing peers in achievement, due in part to difficulties with accessing the general education curriculum both in special schools for the Deaf or self-contained classrooms, as well as in traditional inclusive settings. One way to know if a student has actually had access to, rather than mere exposure to the curriculum is to determine if he has attended to the instruction and participated in the instructional activities. Co-enrollment programming holds promise for addressing the problems with access that D/HH students typically experience in other educational placements; therefore the researcher hypothesized that in this unique setting D/HH students would demonstrate levels of Academic Engagement equal to their hearing peers. The researcher further hypothesized that there would be a relationship between Academic Engagement and the classroom environment, and that this relationship would be similar for D/HH and hearing students. Using a correlational research design, these hypotheses were tested by conducting repeated observations with use of the Mainstream Version of the Code for Instructional Structure and Student Academic Response (MS-CISSAR) for measuring Academic Engagement. Results indicated that D/HH students in a co-enrollment setting were as Academically Engaged as their hearing peers; however they were less engaged in active forms of Academic Engagement (i.e., Academic Responding) than their hearing peers. Associations were found between aspects of Classroom Ecology, such as the size of Instructional Grouping, and the degree of Academic Engagement for both D/HH and hearing students. The associations between Academic Engagement and Classroom Ecology were similar for D/HH and hearing students; however some differences were found as well. The implications of these results are discussed and suggestions are made for future research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectcoenrollmenten_US
dc.subjectdeafen_US
dc.subjecthard of hearingen_US
dc.subjecthearing impaireden_US
dc.subjecttime on tasken_US
dc.subjectSpecial Educationen_US
dc.subjectacademic engagementen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAntia, Shirin D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAntia, Shirin D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMather, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFletcher, Todden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRomero-Contreras, Silviaen_US
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