Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311218
Title:
Recommendations for Growing Standard-Height Wheat Varieties in Arizona
Author:
Ottman, Michael; Hought, Joy M.
Affiliation:
School of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona; Native Seeds/Search
Publisher:
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
Jan-2014
Description:
2 pp.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311218
Abstract:
Until the introduction of semi-dwarf wheat in the late 1960s, wheat varieties were typically one and a half to two times their current height. Most heirloom, traditional, or landrace varieties are considered standard-height wheat (e.g. Sonoran white); in general they are adapted to lower-input conditions, and cannot tolerate high-fertility environments without lodging. Lodging reduces grain yield, delays harvest, and increases harvesting costs. Standard-height wheat needs to be grown at a lower plant density and with less nitrogen and irrigation water than semi-dwarfs in order to prevent lodging, optimize yield, and make the most efficient use of resources.
Type:
text; Pamphlet
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
wheat; semi-dwarf; planting date; seeding rate; nitrogen; phosphorus; irrigation
Series/Report no.:
University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ1612

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOttman, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorHought, Joy M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-11T02:05:51Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-11T02:05:51Z-
dc.date.issued2014-01-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/311218-
dc.description2 pp.en_US
dc.description.abstractUntil the introduction of semi-dwarf wheat in the late 1960s, wheat varieties were typically one and a half to two times their current height. Most heirloom, traditional, or landrace varieties are considered standard-height wheat (e.g. Sonoran white); in general they are adapted to lower-input conditions, and cannot tolerate high-fertility environments without lodging. Lodging reduces grain yield, delays harvest, and increases harvesting costs. Standard-height wheat needs to be grown at a lower plant density and with less nitrogen and irrigation water than semi-dwarfs in order to prevent lodging, optimize yield, and make the most efficient use of resources.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUniversity of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ1612en_US
dc.sourceCALS Publications Archive. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectwheaten_US
dc.subjectsemi-dwarfen_US
dc.subjectplanting dateen_US
dc.subjectseeding rateen_US
dc.subjectnitrogenen_US
dc.subjectphosphorusen_US
dc.subjectirrigationen_US
dc.titleRecommendations for Growing Standard-Height Wheat Varieties in Arizonaen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typePamphleten_US
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Plant Sciences, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNative Seeds/Searchen_US
dc.identifier.calsAZ1612-2014-
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