George Sword's Warrior Narratives: A Study in the Processes of Composition of Lakota Oral Narrative

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/311217
Title:
George Sword's Warrior Narratives: A Study in the Processes of Composition of Lakota Oral Narrative
Author:
Shaw, Delphine R.
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release 18-Nov-2014
Abstract:
This research is the result of a long-standing interest in the work of one individual, George Sword who composed two hundred and forty-five pages of text in the Lakota language using the English alphabet in the period 1896 through 1910. In the past scholars have studied Lakota narratives and songs and with each study new insights are gained. However, the focus generally in oral literary research has been in the study of content and not process in Lakota oral traditions. In order to better understand the characteristics of Lakota oral style this study shows how it is composed and structured in the work of George Sword. The research focus is from a qualitative perspective concerned with exploring, describing, and explaining a culturally specific Lakota oral narrative more commonly found in history and ethnographic disciplines, where it is a special type of case study research. The primary method used is an analysis of historic documents and original text in Lakota to address the issues raised in the general research problem: How do you define Lakota literature? In the end this study shows the way in which Lakota oral narrative is composed, how its practice produced a distinct form. During the course of this study, what became apparent in George Sword's Lakota narratives were the formulaic patterns inherent in the Lakota language used to tell the narratives as well as the recurring themes and story patterns. The primary conclusion is that these patterns originate from a Lakota oral tradition. This analysis can be used to determine whether any given written narrative in Lakota oral tradition is oral or not; and leads the way for further research
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Lakota Studies; Native American Literature; Oral Narrative; Oral Tradition; Storytelling; American Indian Studies; American Indian Literature
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Evers, Larry

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGeorge Sword's Warrior Narratives: A Study in the Processes of Composition of Lakota Oral Narrativeen_US
dc.creatorShaw, Delphine R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShaw, Delphine R.en_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease 18-Nov-2014en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research is the result of a long-standing interest in the work of one individual, George Sword who composed two hundred and forty-five pages of text in the Lakota language using the English alphabet in the period 1896 through 1910. In the past scholars have studied Lakota narratives and songs and with each study new insights are gained. However, the focus generally in oral literary research has been in the study of content and not process in Lakota oral traditions. In order to better understand the characteristics of Lakota oral style this study shows how it is composed and structured in the work of George Sword. The research focus is from a qualitative perspective concerned with exploring, describing, and explaining a culturally specific Lakota oral narrative more commonly found in history and ethnographic disciplines, where it is a special type of case study research. The primary method used is an analysis of historic documents and original text in Lakota to address the issues raised in the general research problem: How do you define Lakota literature? In the end this study shows the way in which Lakota oral narrative is composed, how its practice produced a distinct form. During the course of this study, what became apparent in George Sword's Lakota narratives were the formulaic patterns inherent in the Lakota language used to tell the narratives as well as the recurring themes and story patterns. The primary conclusion is that these patterns originate from a Lakota oral tradition. This analysis can be used to determine whether any given written narrative in Lakota oral tradition is oral or not; and leads the way for further researchen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectLakota Studiesen_US
dc.subjectNative American Literatureen_US
dc.subjectOral Narrativeen_US
dc.subjectOral Traditionen_US
dc.subjectStorytellingen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Literatureen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEvers, Larryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEvers, Larryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLuna-Firebaugh, Eileenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTippeconnic-Fox, Mary Joen_US
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