Market-Based Operation to Improve the Efficiency of Water Supplies from the Colorado River Basin

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/310665
Title:
Market-Based Operation to Improve the Efficiency of Water Supplies from the Colorado River Basin
Author:
Harding, Benjamin L.; Payton, Elizabeth A.; Lord, William B.; Brown, Thomas C.; Rozaklis, Lee T.
Affiliation:
WBLA, Inc., Boulder, CO; WBLA, Inc., Boulder, CO; WBLA, Inc., Boulder, CO; USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO
Issue Date:
1988
Description:
No publication date on item; letter in files dated January 11, 1988 indicates article was submitted for inclusion in the USCID proceedings.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/310665
Abstract:
Disposition of water supplies in the Colorado River Basin was simulated under several different allocation systems and two levels of demand. Under the current system of compacts and reservoir operation rules no significant shortfalls were observed at the current demand level. At future demand levels, shortages reached disruptive levels. These shortfalls principally affected the Metropolitan Water District, and their magnitude depended on assumptions regarding surplus release policies at Lake Mead. Under a system of allocation based on economic values, shortages to high-valued M&I users could be dramatically reduced at the expense of modest increases in shortfalls to lower-valued uses (primarily agriculture), but occasional severe shortages to municipal users in both basins persisted. Shortages to municipal users could be eliminated by instituting a reserve policy in mainstem reservoirs, with water purchased from low-valued uses and maintained in storage for use by high-valued uses during drought periods. This paper reports the quantification of expected relative benefits of alternative management schemes involving transfers of water within the Colorado River Basin. It builds on the results of a study of the disposition of incremental streamflow from forestry practices in the Basin (Brown, et al, in press). The paper first describes the physical and institutional setting of the Colorado River Basin. It then briefly describes the model used to analyze alternative management schemes. Then the estimated effect of management changes is described.
Language:
en_US

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarding, Benjamin L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPayton, Elizabeth A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLord, William B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Thomas C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRozaklis, Lee T.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-30T23:02:45Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-30T23:02:45Z-
dc.date.issued1988-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/310665-
dc.descriptionNo publication date on item; letter in files dated January 11, 1988 indicates article was submitted for inclusion in the USCID proceedings.en_US
dc.description.abstractDisposition of water supplies in the Colorado River Basin was simulated under several different allocation systems and two levels of demand. Under the current system of compacts and reservoir operation rules no significant shortfalls were observed at the current demand level. At future demand levels, shortages reached disruptive levels. These shortfalls principally affected the Metropolitan Water District, and their magnitude depended on assumptions regarding surplus release policies at Lake Mead. Under a system of allocation based on economic values, shortages to high-valued M&I users could be dramatically reduced at the expense of modest increases in shortfalls to lower-valued uses (primarily agriculture), but occasional severe shortages to municipal users in both basins persisted. Shortages to municipal users could be eliminated by instituting a reserve policy in mainstem reservoirs, with water purchased from low-valued uses and maintained in storage for use by high-valued uses during drought periods. This paper reports the quantification of expected relative benefits of alternative management schemes involving transfers of water within the Colorado River Basin. It builds on the results of a study of the disposition of incremental streamflow from forestry practices in the Basin (Brown, et al, in press). The paper first describes the physical and institutional setting of the Colorado River Basin. It then briefly describes the model used to analyze alternative management schemes. Then the estimated effect of management changes is described.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.sourceWater Resources Research Center. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titleMarket-Based Operation to Improve the Efficiency of Water Supplies from the Colorado River Basinen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWBLA, Inc., Boulder, COen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWBLA, Inc., Boulder, COen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWBLA, Inc., Boulder, COen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUSDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, COen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Water Resources Research Center collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Water Resources Research Center at The University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the Center, (520) 621-9591 or see http://wrrc.arizona.edu.en_US
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