Development of Split-protein Systems for Interrogating Biomacromolecules

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/308885
Title:
Development of Split-protein Systems for Interrogating Biomacromolecules
Author:
Shen, Shengyi
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The specific interactions of macromolecules along with the activity of enzymes are central to all aspects of biology. It is well recognized that when the relative concentration or activity of macromolecules is perturbed, it can lead to human diseases. Thus, the development of simple methods for the detection of macromolecules and the activity of enzymes in complex environments is important for understanding biology. Moreover, the development of methods for measuring interactions allows for the testing of inhibitors that can be used as tools or drugs for improving human health. Towards this goal, a promising new method has been developed, which is the focus of this thesis, called split-protein reassembly or protein fragment complementation. In this method, a protein reporter, such as the green fluorescent protein or firefly luciferase, is dissected into two fragments, which are attached to designed adaptor proteins. The designed split-protein systems only produce a measurable signal, either fluorescence or luminescence, when a specific macromolecular interaction or activity is present. In this thesis, I have extended previous research on the direct detection of DNA using split-protein sensors utilizing a red fluorescent protein, dsRED from Discosoma that allows for multiplexed DNA detection. I have designed a new split-luciferase based sensor for detection of poly (ADP-ribose) or PAR, which plays a key role in the response to DNA damage and have applied it for monitoring the activity of poly (ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase that controls PAR levels in the cell. Furthermore, I have significantly expanded upon a three-hybrid split-luciferase system for identifying protein kinase inhibitors. I have designed and tested two orthogonal peptide based chemical inducers of dimerization based on BAD and p53mt conjugates. I have studied these chemically induced dimerization systems in detail in order to begin to provide a theoretical basis for the observed experimental results. Finally, in a less related area, I have developed methods for producing water soluble semiconductor nanoparticles called Quantum Dots (QDs), with potential application in biological imaging. I have developed methods for functionalizing the QDs with orthogonal peptides, which can be potentially used for the assembly of high affinity non-covalent QD targeted proteins.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Poly (ADP-ribose); protein kinase; Quantum Dot; split-protein; Chemistry; chemically induced dimerization
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ghosh, Indraneel

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of Split-protein Systems for Interrogating Biomacromoleculesen_US
dc.creatorShen, Shengyien_US
dc.contributor.authorShen, Shengyien_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe specific interactions of macromolecules along with the activity of enzymes are central to all aspects of biology. It is well recognized that when the relative concentration or activity of macromolecules is perturbed, it can lead to human diseases. Thus, the development of simple methods for the detection of macromolecules and the activity of enzymes in complex environments is important for understanding biology. Moreover, the development of methods for measuring interactions allows for the testing of inhibitors that can be used as tools or drugs for improving human health. Towards this goal, a promising new method has been developed, which is the focus of this thesis, called split-protein reassembly or protein fragment complementation. In this method, a protein reporter, such as the green fluorescent protein or firefly luciferase, is dissected into two fragments, which are attached to designed adaptor proteins. The designed split-protein systems only produce a measurable signal, either fluorescence or luminescence, when a specific macromolecular interaction or activity is present. In this thesis, I have extended previous research on the direct detection of DNA using split-protein sensors utilizing a red fluorescent protein, dsRED from Discosoma that allows for multiplexed DNA detection. I have designed a new split-luciferase based sensor for detection of poly (ADP-ribose) or PAR, which plays a key role in the response to DNA damage and have applied it for monitoring the activity of poly (ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase that controls PAR levels in the cell. Furthermore, I have significantly expanded upon a three-hybrid split-luciferase system for identifying protein kinase inhibitors. I have designed and tested two orthogonal peptide based chemical inducers of dimerization based on BAD and p53mt conjugates. I have studied these chemically induced dimerization systems in detail in order to begin to provide a theoretical basis for the observed experimental results. Finally, in a less related area, I have developed methods for producing water soluble semiconductor nanoparticles called Quantum Dots (QDs), with potential application in biological imaging. I have developed methods for functionalizing the QDs with orthogonal peptides, which can be potentially used for the assembly of high affinity non-covalent QD targeted proteins.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectPoly (ADP-ribose)en_US
dc.subjectprotein kinaseen_US
dc.subjectQuantum Doten_US
dc.subjectsplit-proteinen_US
dc.subjectChemistryen_US
dc.subjectchemically induced dimerizationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGhosh, Indraneelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGhosh, Indraneelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAspinwall, Craig A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHruby, Victor J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMash, Eugene A.en_US
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