The Impact of Urinary Incontinence Severity on Direct Healthcare Utilization, Work Productivity, and Clinical Events among Individuals with Overactive Bladder

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/306998
Title:
The Impact of Urinary Incontinence Severity on Direct Healthcare Utilization, Work Productivity, and Clinical Events among Individuals with Overactive Bladder
Author:
Tsai, Kathleen
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Introduction: The purpose of this research was to assess the relationship between the degree of incontinence severity and treatment seeking behavior, healthcare utilization, and work productivity; and to compare overactive bladder (OAB) related disease burden from a global perspective. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey was administered to eligible participants with idiopathic OAB residing in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, and the United States. Participants were categorized into subgroups with dry, mild (1 leak/per day), moderate (2 leaks/day), and severe (3 leaks/day) urinary incontinence (UI) severity groups. Results: A total of 1,334 participants completed the survey. Persons with more severe urinary incontinence symptoms related to OAB consumed more healthcare resources, had a higher occurrence of OAB related clinical consequences, and higher work productivity loss compared to individuals with less severe symptoms. Even though OAB is associated with significant disease burden, many patients do not seek treatment.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
fracture; healthcare resource use; overactive bladder; urinary incontinence; work productivity; Pharmaceutical Sciences; burden of illness
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Pharmaceutical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Malone, Daniel C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe Impact of Urinary Incontinence Severity on Direct Healthcare Utilization, Work Productivity, and Clinical Events among Individuals with Overactive Bladderen_US
dc.creatorTsai, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorTsai, Kathleenen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The purpose of this research was to assess the relationship between the degree of incontinence severity and treatment seeking behavior, healthcare utilization, and work productivity; and to compare overactive bladder (OAB) related disease burden from a global perspective. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey was administered to eligible participants with idiopathic OAB residing in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, and the United States. Participants were categorized into subgroups with dry, mild (1 leak/per day), moderate (2 leaks/day), and severe (3 leaks/day) urinary incontinence (UI) severity groups. Results: A total of 1,334 participants completed the survey. Persons with more severe urinary incontinence symptoms related to OAB consumed more healthcare resources, had a higher occurrence of OAB related clinical consequences, and higher work productivity loss compared to individuals with less severe symptoms. Even though OAB is associated with significant disease burden, many patients do not seek treatment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectfractureen_US
dc.subjecthealthcare resource useen_US
dc.subjectoveractive bladderen_US
dc.subjecturinary incontinenceen_US
dc.subjectwork productivityen_US
dc.subjectPharmaceutical Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectburden of illnessen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmaceutical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMalone, Daniel C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMalone, Daniel C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArmstrong, Edward P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlobe, Denise R.en_US
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