Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/306986
Title:
Investigation into High Spectral Resolution Lidar Technologies
Author:
Dawsey, Martha Wallis
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) found in their 2007 report that aerosol radiative forcing contributed larger uncertainties to estimates affecting future climate change than any other radiative forcing factor. Lidar is a tool with which this uncertainty can be reduced, increasing our understanding of the impact of aerosols on climate change. Lidar, or laser radar, is a monostatic active remote sensing technique used to measure aerosols and particulates in the atmosphere, with accuracies comparable to in-situ measurements (Russell 2002). High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) systems use a narrow band filter to spectrally separate Doppler broadened aerosol and molecular back-scattered return signals, which allows for range resolved profiles of aerosol extinction and backscatter. The narrow band filter is a key component, for which two novel approaches are currently being used: NASA Langley Research Center has implemented a wide-angle Michelson interferometer in the second version of their airborne HSRL, and Montana State University is using a spherical Fabry-Perot interferometer in a ground based HSRL. In this research, a comprehensive comparative analysis of these two interferometric filters is performed, the result of which is a methodology for the design of narrow band filters for HSRL systems. The techniques presented identify the critical components and analyze the performance of each filter based on the spectral and angular properties, as well as the efficiency.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Fabry-Perot; filter; high spectral resolution lidar; lidar; Michelson; Optical Sciences; design
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reagan, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleInvestigation into High Spectral Resolution Lidar Technologiesen_US
dc.creatorDawsey, Martha Wallisen_US
dc.contributor.authorDawsey, Martha Wallisen_US
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) found in their 2007 report that aerosol radiative forcing contributed larger uncertainties to estimates affecting future climate change than any other radiative forcing factor. Lidar is a tool with which this uncertainty can be reduced, increasing our understanding of the impact of aerosols on climate change. Lidar, or laser radar, is a monostatic active remote sensing technique used to measure aerosols and particulates in the atmosphere, with accuracies comparable to in-situ measurements (Russell 2002). High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) systems use a narrow band filter to spectrally separate Doppler broadened aerosol and molecular back-scattered return signals, which allows for range resolved profiles of aerosol extinction and backscatter. The narrow band filter is a key component, for which two novel approaches are currently being used: NASA Langley Research Center has implemented a wide-angle Michelson interferometer in the second version of their airborne HSRL, and Montana State University is using a spherical Fabry-Perot interferometer in a ground based HSRL. In this research, a comprehensive comparative analysis of these two interferometric filters is performed, the result of which is a methodology for the design of narrow band filters for HSRL systems. The techniques presented identify the critical components and analyze the performance of each filter based on the spectral and angular properties, as well as the efficiency.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectFabry-Peroten_US
dc.subjectfilteren_US
dc.subjecthigh spectral resolution lidaren_US
dc.subjectlidaren_US
dc.subjectMichelsonen_US
dc.subjectOptical Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectdesignen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorReagan, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReagan, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSasian, Joseen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMilster, Thomasen_US
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