Growth and Development of Greenhouse Vegetable Seedlings Under Supplemental LED Lighting

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/306916
Title:
Growth and Development of Greenhouse Vegetable Seedlings Under Supplemental LED Lighting
Author:
Hernández, Ricardo
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The greenhouse industry is interested in light emitting diodes (LEDs) as a light source supplement to solar light to improve plant growth and development. Before LEDs can be adopted as supplemental light for greenhouse crops, plant responses to LED spectral quality need to be investigated. Tomato and cucumber seedlings were grown under different supplemental blue and red photon flux ratios (B:R ratios) under high (16-19 mol m⁻² d⁻¹) and low (5-9 mol m⁻² d⁻¹) solar daily light integrals (DLIs). The supplemental daily light integral was 3.6 mol m⁻² d⁻¹. A treatment without supplemental light served as a control. Both tomato and cucumber seedlings had increased growth rate and improved morphology when grown under the supplemental LED light compared to the control. However, no significant differences were observed for any growth and morphological parameters measured in this study between the different B:R ratios for both cucumber and tomato transplants under high DLI conditions. Cucumber seedlings showed a tendency to decrease dry mass, leaf number and leaf area under low DLI conditions with increasing B:R ratio. Tomato seedlings did not show any differences between the different B:R ratios under low DLI conditions. Seedlings growth and morphology under supplemental LED light were compared to those under supplemental high pressure sodium (HPS) light. Cucumber seedlings under supplemental HPS light had greater shoot dry mass than those under the supplemental red LED light. Tomato shoot dry mass showed no differences between the HPS and red LED supplemental light treatments. Cucumber seedlings were also grown under supplemental LED pulsed lighting and supplemental LED continuous lighting. Cucumber seedlings showed no differences in shoot dry mass and net photosynthetic rate between the treatments. Collectively, these studies concluded that red LED is preferred for supplemental lighting and the increase of blue light does not offer any benefits unless the efficiency of blue LEDs largely exceeds the red LEDs. The results of this research can be used for fixture development by LED manufactures and as a decision making tool for the adoption of supplemental LED lighting by greenhouse growers.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
B:R ratio; DLI; greenhouse; light-emitting diode; spectral quality; Plant Science
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Plant Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kubota, Chieri

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGrowth and Development of Greenhouse Vegetable Seedlings Under Supplemental LED Lightingen_US
dc.creatorHernández, Ricardoen_US
dc.contributor.authorHernández, Ricardoen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe greenhouse industry is interested in light emitting diodes (LEDs) as a light source supplement to solar light to improve plant growth and development. Before LEDs can be adopted as supplemental light for greenhouse crops, plant responses to LED spectral quality need to be investigated. Tomato and cucumber seedlings were grown under different supplemental blue and red photon flux ratios (B:R ratios) under high (16-19 mol m⁻² d⁻¹) and low (5-9 mol m⁻² d⁻¹) solar daily light integrals (DLIs). The supplemental daily light integral was 3.6 mol m⁻² d⁻¹. A treatment without supplemental light served as a control. Both tomato and cucumber seedlings had increased growth rate and improved morphology when grown under the supplemental LED light compared to the control. However, no significant differences were observed for any growth and morphological parameters measured in this study between the different B:R ratios for both cucumber and tomato transplants under high DLI conditions. Cucumber seedlings showed a tendency to decrease dry mass, leaf number and leaf area under low DLI conditions with increasing B:R ratio. Tomato seedlings did not show any differences between the different B:R ratios under low DLI conditions. Seedlings growth and morphology under supplemental LED light were compared to those under supplemental high pressure sodium (HPS) light. Cucumber seedlings under supplemental HPS light had greater shoot dry mass than those under the supplemental red LED light. Tomato shoot dry mass showed no differences between the HPS and red LED supplemental light treatments. Cucumber seedlings were also grown under supplemental LED pulsed lighting and supplemental LED continuous lighting. Cucumber seedlings showed no differences in shoot dry mass and net photosynthetic rate between the treatments. Collectively, these studies concluded that red LED is preferred for supplemental lighting and the increase of blue light does not offer any benefits unless the efficiency of blue LEDs largely exceeds the red LEDs. The results of this research can be used for fixture development by LED manufactures and as a decision making tool for the adoption of supplemental LED lighting by greenhouse growers.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectB:R ratioen_US
dc.subjectDLIen_US
dc.subjectgreenhouseen_US
dc.subjectlight-emitting diodeen_US
dc.subjectspectral qualityen_US
dc.subjectPlant Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKubota, Chierien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRay, Dennis T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKacira, Muraten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGiacomelli, Gene A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMitchell, Cary A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKubota, Chierien_US
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