Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/306688
Title:
Constraints and Categories of Vadose Zone Monitoring Devices
Author:
Everett, Lorne G.; Hoylman, Edward W.; Wilson, L. Graham; McMillion, Leslie G.
Affiliation:
Kaman Tempo, Natural Resources Program; Kaman Tempo, Natural Resources Program; Water Resources Research Center; U.S. EPA, Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab, Las Vegas, NV
Citation:
Everett, L. G., Hoylman, E. W., Wilson, L. G. and McMillion, L. G. (1984), Constraints and Categories of Vadose Zone Monitoring Devices. Groundwater Monitoring & Remediation, 4: 26–32. doi: 10.1111/j.1745-6592.1984.tb01215.x
Publisher:
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Journal:
Groundwater Monitoring & Remediation
Issue Date:
Mar-1984
Description:
UA affiliates can use the link in "Additional Links" to access this article.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/306688
DOI:
10.1111/j.1745-6592.1984.tb01215.x
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1745-6592.1984.tb01215.x
Abstract:
Traditional monitoring methods using chemical analysis of ground water samples to detect pollutant migration are being superseded or used in conjunction with innovative approaches. A need to detect pollutants before they reach the water table has drawn interest to vadose (unsaturated) zone monitoring and brought together hydrogeologists, soil scientists and agricultural engineers who have been working on this subject for years. Recent studies have identified over 50 different types of vadose zone monitoring devices and methods that have optimum utility in varying hydrogeologic settings. In general, measurements made in the vadose zone are trying to define storage, transmission of liquid waste in terms of flux and velocity, and pollutant mobility. Criteria for the selection of alternative vadose zone monitoring methods are important for the development of site-specific systems. These criteria include: type of site; applicability to new, active, and abandoned sites; power requirements; depth limitations; multiple use capability; type of data collection system; reliability and life expectancy; degree of operational complexity; direct versus indirect methods; applicability to alternate media; effect on flow regime; and effect of hazardous waste on sampling or measurements. Application of the selection criteria is discussed in Everett et al. (1982a).
Type:
text; Article
Language:
en_US

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEverett, Lorne G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHoylman, Edward W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilson, L. Grahamen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcMillion, Leslie G.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-10T22:33:42Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-10T22:33:42Z-
dc.date.issued1984-03-
dc.identifier.citationEverett, L. G., Hoylman, E. W., Wilson, L. G. and McMillion, L. G. (1984), Constraints and Categories of Vadose Zone Monitoring Devices. Groundwater Monitoring & Remediation, 4: 26–32. doi: 10.1111/j.1745-6592.1984.tb01215.xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1745-6592.1984.tb01215.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/306688-
dc.descriptionUA affiliates can use the link in "Additional Links" to access this article.en_US
dc.description.abstractTraditional monitoring methods using chemical analysis of ground water samples to detect pollutant migration are being superseded or used in conjunction with innovative approaches. A need to detect pollutants before they reach the water table has drawn interest to vadose (unsaturated) zone monitoring and brought together hydrogeologists, soil scientists and agricultural engineers who have been working on this subject for years. Recent studies have identified over 50 different types of vadose zone monitoring devices and methods that have optimum utility in varying hydrogeologic settings. In general, measurements made in the vadose zone are trying to define storage, transmission of liquid waste in terms of flux and velocity, and pollutant mobility. Criteria for the selection of alternative vadose zone monitoring methods are important for the development of site-specific systems. These criteria include: type of site; applicability to new, active, and abandoned sites; power requirements; depth limitations; multiple use capability; type of data collection system; reliability and life expectancy; degree of operational complexity; direct versus indirect methods; applicability to alternate media; effect on flow regime; and effect of hazardous waste on sampling or measurements. Application of the selection criteria is discussed in Everett et al. (1982a).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1745-6592.1984.tb01215.xen_US
dc.sourceWater Resources Research Center. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titleConstraints and Categories of Vadose Zone Monitoring Devicesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentKaman Tempo, Natural Resources Programen_US
dc.contributor.departmentKaman Tempo, Natural Resources Programen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Research Centeren_US
dc.contributor.departmentU.S. EPA, Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab, Las Vegas, NVen_US
dc.identifier.journalGroundwater Monitoring & Remediationen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Water Resources Research Center collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Water Resources Research Center at The University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the Center, (520) 621-9591 or see http://wrrc.arizona.edu.en_US
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