Test of Nanofilter Method of Testing Recharged Municipal Effluent: Project Report

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/306685
Title:
Test of Nanofilter Method of Testing Recharged Municipal Effluent: Project Report
Author:
Cluff, C. Brent; Amy, Gary L.; Dutt, Gordon R.; Gerba, Charles P.; Alleman, Bruce C.; Kutz, Susan M.; Amer, Saud A.; Hickman, Carl E.
Affiliation:
Water Resources Research Center; Department of Civil Engineering; Department of Soil and Water Science; Department of Microbiology; Department of Civil Engineering; Department of Microbiology; Department of Soil and Water Science
Publisher:
University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
Mar-1989
Description:
A Joint Effort by The John F. Long Foundation and The University of Arizona / March 1989 / Submitted To: John F. Long Foundation, Inc.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/306685
Abstract:
Introduction: The nanofilter is a relatively new water treatment option that has been commercially available since 1986. The name nanofilter is used here as a generic name rather than a specific product name. There are at least five companies that make filter elements that can be classified as nanofilters (City of Ft. Myers, 1987). The nanofilter operates on a molecular scale and is related to reverse osmosis. Simply stated, this process treats water by forcing it through a porous membrane. The water molecules are able to pass through the membrane, as well as some of the smaller organic and inorganic molecules in the water. The larger organic and inorganic molecules are removed. The nanofilter will remove most of the dissolved solids (salinity) and hardness plus a large percentage of the dissolved organic matter including trihalomethanes (THM) precursors and essentially all of the bacteria and viruses. THM and TOX precursors are naturally occurring organics (humic and fluvic acids) that will produce THMs and organic halogens (TOX) (both are suspected carcinogens) when disinfectants such as chlorine or chloramines are added to the water. Nanofiltration has a built in safety feature in that the membrane compresses slightly as it ages which produces even better quality of water over time. In contrast activated charcoal has to be continously monitored to make sure its absorption capacity has not been used up, the quality of water deteriates over time. Nanofiltration, sometimes called membrane softening, is designed to be used for water containing 300-1200 ppm salinity. Muncipal effluent in Arizona generally has 600 to 1200 ppm salinity so this process should work well. It is particularly effective in removing dissolved organics, virus, bacteria and parasitic protozoans. The nanofilter is being used in several Florida locations. The City of Fort Myers in Florida is presently constructing the largest of these facilities, a 20 million gallon per day plant (City of Ft Myers, 1987).
Type:
text; Report
Language:
en_US

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCluff, C. Brenten_US
dc.contributor.authorAmy, Gary L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDutt, Gordon R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAlleman, Bruce C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKutz, Susan M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAmer, Saud A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHickman, Carl E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-10T19:19:05Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-10T19:19:05Z-
dc.date.issued1989-03-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/306685-
dc.descriptionA Joint Effort by The John F. Long Foundation and The University of Arizona / March 1989 / Submitted To: John F. Long Foundation, Inc.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The nanofilter is a relatively new water treatment option that has been commercially available since 1986. The name nanofilter is used here as a generic name rather than a specific product name. There are at least five companies that make filter elements that can be classified as nanofilters (City of Ft. Myers, 1987). The nanofilter operates on a molecular scale and is related to reverse osmosis. Simply stated, this process treats water by forcing it through a porous membrane. The water molecules are able to pass through the membrane, as well as some of the smaller organic and inorganic molecules in the water. The larger organic and inorganic molecules are removed. The nanofilter will remove most of the dissolved solids (salinity) and hardness plus a large percentage of the dissolved organic matter including trihalomethanes (THM) precursors and essentially all of the bacteria and viruses. THM and TOX precursors are naturally occurring organics (humic and fluvic acids) that will produce THMs and organic halogens (TOX) (both are suspected carcinogens) when disinfectants such as chlorine or chloramines are added to the water. Nanofiltration has a built in safety feature in that the membrane compresses slightly as it ages which produces even better quality of water over time. In contrast activated charcoal has to be continously monitored to make sure its absorption capacity has not been used up, the quality of water deteriates over time. Nanofiltration, sometimes called membrane softening, is designed to be used for water containing 300-1200 ppm salinity. Muncipal effluent in Arizona generally has 600 to 1200 ppm salinity so this process should work well. It is particularly effective in removing dissolved organics, virus, bacteria and parasitic protozoans. The nanofilter is being used in several Florida locations. The City of Fort Myers in Florida is presently constructing the largest of these facilities, a 20 million gallon per day plant (City of Ft Myers, 1987).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.sourceWater Resources Research Center. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titleTest of Nanofilter Method of Testing Recharged Municipal Effluent: Project Reporten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Research Centeren_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Civil Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Soil and Water Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Microbiologyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Civil Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Microbiologyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Soil and Water Scienceen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Water Resources Research Center collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Water Resources Research Center at The University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the Center, (520) 621-9591 or see http://wrrc.arizona.edu.en_US
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