Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/306475
Title:
Slow Sand/Nanofiltration of Surface Water
Author:
Cluff, C. Brent; Gerba, Charles P.; Amy, Gary L.
Affiliation:
University of Arizona; University of Arizona; University of Colorado, Boulder
Issue Date:
6-Aug-1990
Description:
Paper presented at "Membranes For Drinking Water Treatment Conference", Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH, August 6, 1990.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/306475
Abstract:
Introduction: Through the studies published in Drinking Water and Health (1977) the nation has become more aware of the carcinogenic nature of the byproducts of disinfection such as trihalomethanes. Trihalomethanes are formed when the disinfectant chlorine reacts with the precursors, humic and fluvic acids that are naturally occuring in all surface water. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a minimum contaminent level of 100 ppb on THM's that many in the health agencies feel need to be lowered. The problem is that when the MCL's are lowered utilities will be enclined to chlorimines and chloride dioxide which have been found to be mutagenic. Drinking Water and Health (1987) found the Suggested No-Adverse Response Levels (SNARLs) for chioramines for a child is 0.166 ppm, for an adult it is 0.581. The SNARL for chlorine dioxide is 0.06 ppm for a child and 0.210 ppm for an adult. These levels for utilities are virtually impossible to maintain and still have a residual at the end of the system.
Language:
en_US

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCluff, C. Brenten_US
dc.contributor.authorGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAmy, Gary L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-07T01:13:53Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-07T01:13:53Z-
dc.date.issued1990-08-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/306475-
dc.descriptionPaper presented at "Membranes For Drinking Water Treatment Conference", Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH, August 6, 1990.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Through the studies published in Drinking Water and Health (1977) the nation has become more aware of the carcinogenic nature of the byproducts of disinfection such as trihalomethanes. Trihalomethanes are formed when the disinfectant chlorine reacts with the precursors, humic and fluvic acids that are naturally occuring in all surface water. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a minimum contaminent level of 100 ppb on THM's that many in the health agencies feel need to be lowered. The problem is that when the MCL's are lowered utilities will be enclined to chlorimines and chloride dioxide which have been found to be mutagenic. Drinking Water and Health (1987) found the Suggested No-Adverse Response Levels (SNARLs) for chioramines for a child is 0.166 ppm, for an adult it is 0.581. The SNARL for chlorine dioxide is 0.06 ppm for a child and 0.210 ppm for an adult. These levels for utilities are virtually impossible to maintain and still have a residual at the end of the system.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.sourceWater Resources Research Center. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titleSlow Sand/Nanofiltration of Surface Wateren_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Colorado, Boulderen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Water Resources Research Center collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Water Resources Research Center at The University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the Center, (520) 621-9591 or see http://wrrc.arizona.edu.en_US
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