Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/306147
Title:
Rule Establishment in Two High School Classrooms
Author:
Melrose, Bradford Alan Patrick
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study explored how rule systems evolved in two high school social studies classes. To accomplish this, detailed descriptions and analysis of the practices and processes by which teachers established and maintained rules were conducted in two classrooms over a nine-week observational timeline. In addition, the teachers were interviewed at the beginning, middle, and end of the observation period to gain insight into how they thought about their classes and reacted to the daily experiences they were having in these settings. Findings indicated that the teachers utilized the same enactment practices to uphold their management and rule systems, however, each operationalized these practices in dissimilar ways. This was largely due to the fact that the teachers' goal structures and beliefs about the function of management and classroom rules affected their implementation practices. Both set similar goals for managing the classroom and fostering self-discipline and student responsibility, yet each experienced problems attempting to balance student affordances for responsibility with teacher surveillance and interventions. One system thrived on explicitness and enforcement, while the other was dedicated to helping students develop autonomous morality. In reaction, both teachers had mixed feelings and/or satisfaction regarding the outcomes. This contrast was especially useful in demonstrating the inherent tensions in classroom systems that attempt to orchestrate students' personal responsibility. Such systems depend upon general norms and/or rules to guide student behavior. When students do not accept these norms, a teacher is constrained from imposing explicit rules and consequences because such practices take responsibility away from students and thus undermine the very system the teacher is attempting to implement. Overall, further research on this inherent tension is needed to better understand how teachers can orchestrate student responsibility in schools and classrooms.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Classroom Rules; High School; Rule Enforcement; Rule Establishment; Rule Systems; Teaching & Teacher Education; Classroom Management
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Teaching, Learning and Sociocultural Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Doyle, Walter

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRule Establishment in Two High School Classroomsen_US
dc.creatorMelrose, Bradford Alan Patricken_US
dc.contributor.authorMelrose, Bradford Alan Patricken_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explored how rule systems evolved in two high school social studies classes. To accomplish this, detailed descriptions and analysis of the practices and processes by which teachers established and maintained rules were conducted in two classrooms over a nine-week observational timeline. In addition, the teachers were interviewed at the beginning, middle, and end of the observation period to gain insight into how they thought about their classes and reacted to the daily experiences they were having in these settings. Findings indicated that the teachers utilized the same enactment practices to uphold their management and rule systems, however, each operationalized these practices in dissimilar ways. This was largely due to the fact that the teachers' goal structures and beliefs about the function of management and classroom rules affected their implementation practices. Both set similar goals for managing the classroom and fostering self-discipline and student responsibility, yet each experienced problems attempting to balance student affordances for responsibility with teacher surveillance and interventions. One system thrived on explicitness and enforcement, while the other was dedicated to helping students develop autonomous morality. In reaction, both teachers had mixed feelings and/or satisfaction regarding the outcomes. This contrast was especially useful in demonstrating the inherent tensions in classroom systems that attempt to orchestrate students' personal responsibility. Such systems depend upon general norms and/or rules to guide student behavior. When students do not accept these norms, a teacher is constrained from imposing explicit rules and consequences because such practices take responsibility away from students and thus undermine the very system the teacher is attempting to implement. Overall, further research on this inherent tension is needed to better understand how teachers can orchestrate student responsibility in schools and classrooms.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectClassroom Rulesen_US
dc.subjectHigh Schoolen_US
dc.subjectRule Enforcementen_US
dc.subjectRule Establishmenten_US
dc.subjectRule Systemsen_US
dc.subjectTeaching & Teacher Educationen_US
dc.subjectClassroom Managementen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching, Learning and Sociocultural Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDoyle, Walteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDoyle, Walteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGriego-Jones, Tonien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDokter, Erinen_US
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