"Energy is...Life": Meaning Making Through Dialogue in a Tribal College Physics Course

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/306133
Title:
"Energy is...Life": Meaning Making Through Dialogue in a Tribal College Physics Course
Author:
Antonellis, Jessica Christel
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research is an exploration of students' meaning making around physical concepts through connections to students' funds of knowledge. This qualitative case study, influenced by Indigenous methodologies, focused on two Native students in a tribal college introductory physics course, exploring the personal, cultural, and philosophical connections that were voiced in dialogic interactions among the students and instructor. The data were collected through audio recordings of class sessions and reflective journaling by the instructor/researcher. Analysis identified dialogues in which meaning making took place, and the funds of knowledge that students brought to bear on these dialogues. The results of the analysis of these meaning-making occasions are presented by physical concept. For both students, the cultural connections they brought in were ways for them to incorporate their out-of-class identities and to consider their cultures from a scientific perspective. The influence of the students' personal connections was just as important as that of the cultural connections; the shared classroom context was also a valuable resource in the for collaborative meaning making. Both students both enjoyed examining the philosophical and spiritual implications of physical ideas; these dialogues provided windows into students' thinking that would not have been accessible in other ways. The students also made meanings about the nature of science that meshed with their identities and created a space for them to identify as scientists, and both came to view science as part of their cultural heritage. Allowing students free reign to make connections and empowering them to make decisions about their own learning were means of encouraging students to develop meaningful conceptual understanding. By investigating the meanings students made around physical content, we can learn about what motivates them, what is important to them, and potentially how to structure curricula that will better support their meaning making in other courses.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
discourse; tribal college; Teaching & Teacher Education; cultural relevance
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Teaching, Learning and Sociocultural Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Arenas, Alberto; Doyle, Walter

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.title"Energy is...Life": Meaning Making Through Dialogue in a Tribal College Physics Courseen_US
dc.creatorAntonellis, Jessica Christelen_US
dc.contributor.authorAntonellis, Jessica Christelen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research is an exploration of students' meaning making around physical concepts through connections to students' funds of knowledge. This qualitative case study, influenced by Indigenous methodologies, focused on two Native students in a tribal college introductory physics course, exploring the personal, cultural, and philosophical connections that were voiced in dialogic interactions among the students and instructor. The data were collected through audio recordings of class sessions and reflective journaling by the instructor/researcher. Analysis identified dialogues in which meaning making took place, and the funds of knowledge that students brought to bear on these dialogues. The results of the analysis of these meaning-making occasions are presented by physical concept. For both students, the cultural connections they brought in were ways for them to incorporate their out-of-class identities and to consider their cultures from a scientific perspective. The influence of the students' personal connections was just as important as that of the cultural connections; the shared classroom context was also a valuable resource in the for collaborative meaning making. Both students both enjoyed examining the philosophical and spiritual implications of physical ideas; these dialogues provided windows into students' thinking that would not have been accessible in other ways. The students also made meanings about the nature of science that meshed with their identities and created a space for them to identify as scientists, and both came to view science as part of their cultural heritage. Allowing students free reign to make connections and empowering them to make decisions about their own learning were means of encouraging students to develop meaningful conceptual understanding. By investigating the meanings students made around physical content, we can learn about what motivates them, what is important to them, and potentially how to structure curricula that will better support their meaning making in other courses.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectdiscourseen_US
dc.subjecttribal collegeen_US
dc.subjectTeaching & Teacher Educationen_US
dc.subjectcultural relevanceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching, Learning and Sociocultural Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorArenas, Albertoen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDoyle, Walteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArenas, Albertoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDoyle, Walteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLevine-Donnerstein, Deboraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLomawaima, K. Tsianinaen_US
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