Displaced Colombians Living in Ciudad Bolívar, Bogotá: Perceptions of Health and Access to Health Services

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/306131
Title:
Displaced Colombians Living in Ciudad Bolívar, Bogotá: Perceptions of Health and Access to Health Services
Author:
Walsh, Janée Lorraine
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Background: In the last two decades Bogota, Colombia has seen a massive influx of internally displaced people (IDP) settling in its periphery where residents face the worst living, social, and economic conditions despite the 2011 passing of The Victims Law entitling IDP victims access to free shelter, food, education, and healthcare. Objective: To understand the circumstances and health care needs of Colombian IDPs, determine trends of health perceptions among IDPs and assess and quality of health services among IDPs in Bogota. Methods: Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 12 professionals who work with IDPs and 36 IDPs. Interviews explored opinions of common health conditions and barriers to access health services in IDP communities. The EQ-5D survey about perceptions of health was administered measuring mobility, self-care, daily activities, pain, and depression/anxiety. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded for analysis. Results: Most IDPs did not indicate suffering with mobility, self-care, and ability to conduct daily activities. Seventy-five percent of participants indicated moderate to severe pain and 86.85% expressed feeling some form of depression or anxiety. Environmental factors are common contributors to poor health conditions. Individual and societal factors surfaced as detriments to accessing health services. The process to be included in The Victims Law registry is arduous. Although the Victims Law allows IDPs to access health services, many missing links in the system thwart quality health care delivery and discourage IDPs to utilize the health care system. Conclusion: Despite efforts to mitigate the struggles IPDs suffer there remain much needed health services and organizational improvements for the IDP community in Bogota.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Conflict and violence; EQ-5D; Health Perceptions; Internally Displaced Persons; Refugee; Latin American Studies; Access to Health Services
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Latin American Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Vasquez-Leon, Marcela
Committee Chair:
Vasquez-Leon, Marcela

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDisplaced Colombians Living in Ciudad Bolívar, Bogotá: Perceptions of Health and Access to Health Servicesen_US
dc.creatorWalsh, Janée Lorraineen_US
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Janée Lorraineen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: In the last two decades Bogota, Colombia has seen a massive influx of internally displaced people (IDP) settling in its periphery where residents face the worst living, social, and economic conditions despite the 2011 passing of The Victims Law entitling IDP victims access to free shelter, food, education, and healthcare. Objective: To understand the circumstances and health care needs of Colombian IDPs, determine trends of health perceptions among IDPs and assess and quality of health services among IDPs in Bogota. Methods: Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 12 professionals who work with IDPs and 36 IDPs. Interviews explored opinions of common health conditions and barriers to access health services in IDP communities. The EQ-5D survey about perceptions of health was administered measuring mobility, self-care, daily activities, pain, and depression/anxiety. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded for analysis. Results: Most IDPs did not indicate suffering with mobility, self-care, and ability to conduct daily activities. Seventy-five percent of participants indicated moderate to severe pain and 86.85% expressed feeling some form of depression or anxiety. Environmental factors are common contributors to poor health conditions. Individual and societal factors surfaced as detriments to accessing health services. The process to be included in The Victims Law registry is arduous. Although the Victims Law allows IDPs to access health services, many missing links in the system thwart quality health care delivery and discourage IDPs to utilize the health care system. Conclusion: Despite efforts to mitigate the struggles IPDs suffer there remain much needed health services and organizational improvements for the IDP community in Bogota.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectConflict and violenceen_US
dc.subjectEQ-5Den_US
dc.subjectHealth Perceptionsen_US
dc.subjectInternally Displaced Personsen_US
dc.subjectRefugeeen_US
dc.subjectLatin American Studiesen_US
dc.subjectAccess to Health Servicesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLatin American Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVasquez-Leon, Marcelaen_US
dc.contributor.chairVasquez-Leon, Marcelaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVasquez-Leon, Marcelaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCarvajal, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhiteford, Scotten_US
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