Mapping of Sonoran Desert Vegetation Communities of San Cristobal Valley and Southern Sentinel Plains, Barry M. Goldwater Range AND Variables Influencing Route Proliferation in the Barry M. Goldwater Range's San Cristobal Valley

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/305875
Title:
Mapping of Sonoran Desert Vegetation Communities of San Cristobal Valley and Southern Sentinel Plains, Barry M. Goldwater Range AND Variables Influencing Route Proliferation in the Barry M. Goldwater Range's San Cristobal Valley
Author:
Whitbeck, Douglas Craig
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The vegetation associations in the Eastern San Cristobal Valley of Barry M. Goldwater Range-East (BMGR) were mapped using a combination of field surveys (relevés) and interpretation of aerial imagery in order to contribute to ongoing mapping efforts of Barry M. Goldwater Range-East. Throughout the San Cristobal Valley, 149 relevé samples were collected to characterize the vegetation associations. Seventeen vegetation associations were identified and mapped, including a new Larrea tridentata/Ambrosia dumosa/Grusonia kunzei (Creosote bush-White bursage-Devil's cholla) association. Accuracy assessment of the map was conducted using a contingency table finding the map to be 82% accurate. Route proliferation in the San Cristobal Valley of Barry M. Goldwater Range-East (BMGR) was also mapped and measured using remotely sensed imagery in geographic information systems and modeled with geographical variables in a multivariate regression. Throughout the San Cristobal Valley study site, 6,878 km of unauthorized routes were identified. Geographic explanatory variables distance from slopes greater than 34% (b = -3.252e-5, p<0.001) and the most influential variable distance from unauthorized routes (b = -0.006568, p<0.001) were tested for significance and influence in predicting unauthorized route density. The resulting model, built from the two significant geographic variables in a multivariate regression, was able to explain 57% of the variability in the data. The results from this study have shown that through the use of GIS and remote sensing, unauthorized route density can be predicted by geographic variables which can then be used to make future route management decisions.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Border; Border Patrol; Route Proliferation; Sonoran Desert; Vegetation Mapping; Natural Resources; Arid Environments
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fehmi, Jeffrey S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMapping of Sonoran Desert Vegetation Communities of San Cristobal Valley and Southern Sentinel Plains, Barry M. Goldwater Range AND Variables Influencing Route Proliferation in the Barry M. Goldwater Range's San Cristobal Valleyen_US
dc.creatorWhitbeck, Douglas Craigen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhitbeck, Douglas Craigen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe vegetation associations in the Eastern San Cristobal Valley of Barry M. Goldwater Range-East (BMGR) were mapped using a combination of field surveys (relevés) and interpretation of aerial imagery in order to contribute to ongoing mapping efforts of Barry M. Goldwater Range-East. Throughout the San Cristobal Valley, 149 relevé samples were collected to characterize the vegetation associations. Seventeen vegetation associations were identified and mapped, including a new Larrea tridentata/Ambrosia dumosa/Grusonia kunzei (Creosote bush-White bursage-Devil's cholla) association. Accuracy assessment of the map was conducted using a contingency table finding the map to be 82% accurate. Route proliferation in the San Cristobal Valley of Barry M. Goldwater Range-East (BMGR) was also mapped and measured using remotely sensed imagery in geographic information systems and modeled with geographical variables in a multivariate regression. Throughout the San Cristobal Valley study site, 6,878 km of unauthorized routes were identified. Geographic explanatory variables distance from slopes greater than 34% (b = -3.252e-5, p<0.001) and the most influential variable distance from unauthorized routes (b = -0.006568, p<0.001) were tested for significance and influence in predicting unauthorized route density. The resulting model, built from the two significant geographic variables in a multivariate regression, was able to explain 57% of the variability in the data. The results from this study have shown that through the use of GIS and remote sensing, unauthorized route density can be predicted by geographic variables which can then be used to make future route management decisions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectBorderen_US
dc.subjectBorder Patrolen_US
dc.subjectRoute Proliferationen_US
dc.subjectSonoran Deserten_US
dc.subjectVegetation Mappingen_US
dc.subjectNatural Resourcesen_US
dc.subjectArid Environmentsen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFehmi, Jeffrey S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFehmi, Jeffrey S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuertin, Philen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGimblett, Randyen_US
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