System for Managing Saline and Run-off Water for Fruit and Crop Production in Arid Regions of Mexico

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/305542
Title:
System for Managing Saline and Run-off Water for Fruit and Crop Production in Arid Regions of Mexico
Author:
Gavande, Sampat A.; Cluff, Brent C.; Nahlawi, Nazir
Affiliation:
FAO/UNDP Project; FAO/UNDP Project; FAO/UNDP Project
Issue Date:
1976
Description:
FAO/UNDP MEX 74/003 / Technical Report / Prepared for the International Conference on Managing Saline Water for Irrigation, Lubbock, Texas, U.S.A. August 16-20, 1976. / FAO of United Nations Project, UAAAN/FC / Buenavista, Saltillo, Coahuila, 1976.; Note: Item states For Internal Use only. Online copy not available.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/305542
Abstract:
INTRODUCTION: More than 52% cultivable area of Mexico is classified as arid and semi-arid. Nearly half of this area, particularly in the Northern States is extremely arid and presents with some salinity, alkalinity and water logging problems. Ground water, when available for irrigation, is often saline or moderately saline-sodic. The soils of this region are calcareous and contain some salts and sodium. Soils also contain sub-surface horizon rich in carbonate and compact in nature, which may be 30-90 cms below the ground surface. Before planning a major irrigation system for crop production, provision of drainage and leaching of salts is often recommended for this region. The good quality water from underground source may rarely be available for leaching salts and when available pumping costs are prohibitively expensive. It has also been pointed out in the past that such lands could be used to harvest water. In fact, rudimentary water harvesting systems have been established by local people in some parts of this area. Thus, with the need for integral land use and water reclamation in mind, a multipurpose water use and water harvesting system was developed. The requirements of this system, among others, are: (1) To collect enough water for multiple use inside or outside the system, (2) To increase the desired production of the marginal saline land within the system, and, (3) To provide an economically feasible long term farming system for the low-income community. Such system is under development at the Ejido San Francisco del Barrial, near Parras in the State of Coahuila.
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
saline water; irrigation; arid zones; fruit crops

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGavande, Sampat A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCluff, Brent C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNahlawi, Naziren_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-18T23:19:16Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-18T23:19:16Z-
dc.date.issued1976-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/305542-
dc.descriptionFAO/UNDP MEX 74/003 / Technical Report / Prepared for the International Conference on Managing Saline Water for Irrigation, Lubbock, Texas, U.S.A. August 16-20, 1976. / FAO of United Nations Project, UAAAN/FC / Buenavista, Saltillo, Coahuila, 1976.en_US
dc.descriptionNote: Item states For Internal Use only. Online copy not available.en_US
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: More than 52% cultivable area of Mexico is classified as arid and semi-arid. Nearly half of this area, particularly in the Northern States is extremely arid and presents with some salinity, alkalinity and water logging problems. Ground water, when available for irrigation, is often saline or moderately saline-sodic. The soils of this region are calcareous and contain some salts and sodium. Soils also contain sub-surface horizon rich in carbonate and compact in nature, which may be 30-90 cms below the ground surface. Before planning a major irrigation system for crop production, provision of drainage and leaching of salts is often recommended for this region. The good quality water from underground source may rarely be available for leaching salts and when available pumping costs are prohibitively expensive. It has also been pointed out in the past that such lands could be used to harvest water. In fact, rudimentary water harvesting systems have been established by local people in some parts of this area. Thus, with the need for integral land use and water reclamation in mind, a multipurpose water use and water harvesting system was developed. The requirements of this system, among others, are: (1) To collect enough water for multiple use inside or outside the system, (2) To increase the desired production of the marginal saline land within the system, and, (3) To provide an economically feasible long term farming system for the low-income community. Such system is under development at the Ejido San Francisco del Barrial, near Parras in the State of Coahuila.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.sourceWater Resources Research Center. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectsaline wateren_US
dc.subjectirrigationen_US
dc.subjectarid zonesen_US
dc.subjectfruit cropsen_US
dc.titleSystem for Managing Saline and Run-off Water for Fruit and Crop Production in Arid Regions of Mexicoen_US
dc.contributor.departmentFAO/UNDP Projecten_US
dc.contributor.departmentFAO/UNDP Projecten_US
dc.contributor.departmentFAO/UNDP Projecten_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Water Resources Research Center collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Water Resources Research Center at The University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the Center, (520) 621-9591 or see http://wrrc.arizona.edu.en_US
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