Hydrological and Environmental Controls on Water Management in Semiarid Urban Areas

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/305431
Title:
Hydrological and Environmental Controls on Water Management in Semiarid Urban Areas
Author:
Resnick, Sol; DeCook, K. J.
Affiliation:
Water Resources Research Center; Water Resources Research Center
Publisher:
Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
Sep-1980
Description:
Project Completion Report, OWRT Project No. B-012-ARIZ / Agreement No. 14-31-0001-3056 / Period of Operation: July 1969 to June 1972 / Acknowledgement: The work upon which this report is based was supported by funds provided by the United States Department of the Interior, Office of Water Resources Research, as authorized under the Water Resources Research Act of 1964.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/305431
Abstract:
Rainfall and runoff studies initiated in 1968 by the University of Arizona provide data for three small urban watersheds with different land use patterns in Tucson, Arizona. Annual precipitation of about 11 inches produces annual runoff, as measured at outflow flumes, ranging from 1.30 to 3.95 inches, produced by 15 to 23 runoff events per year. About 60 to 70 percent of the annual runoff events occur in the summer season, as does 65 to 75 percent of the annual volume of measured runoff. Water samples collected on a lumped basis show generally high concentrations of suspended sediment, bacterial loading, and dissolved organics. Initial field treatment and exploratory laboratory studies of treatment methods indicate that three days is an optimal length of time for detention storage of runoff, reducing average pollutant concentrations to 62 mg /1 of turbidity, total coliform of 70 -3200 organisms per 100 mg /1, and 7 mg /1 of chemical oxygen demand. Simple laboratory treatment with alum and polyelectrolyte yielded an 80 percent reduction in COD, 90 percent reduction in bacterial loading, and appreciable clarification of the runoff samples. Continuing research should be conducted to utilize a longer data record for improving understanding of rainfall- runoff relations; to use distributed sampling within individual watershed areas to define specific pollutant source areas; and to incorporate economic and legal questions involved in the utilization of urban runoff in an arid area.
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Urban hydrology -- Arizona -- Tucson.; Water resources development -- Environmental aspects -- Arizona -- Tucson.; Urban runoff -- Arizona -- Tucson.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorResnick, Solen_US
dc.contributor.authorDeCook, K. J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-14T21:41:52Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-14T21:41:52Z-
dc.date.issued1980-09-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/305431-
dc.descriptionProject Completion Report, OWRT Project No. B-012-ARIZ / Agreement No. 14-31-0001-3056 / Period of Operation: July 1969 to June 1972 / Acknowledgement: The work upon which this report is based was supported by funds provided by the United States Department of the Interior, Office of Water Resources Research, as authorized under the Water Resources Research Act of 1964.en_US
dc.description.abstractRainfall and runoff studies initiated in 1968 by the University of Arizona provide data for three small urban watersheds with different land use patterns in Tucson, Arizona. Annual precipitation of about 11 inches produces annual runoff, as measured at outflow flumes, ranging from 1.30 to 3.95 inches, produced by 15 to 23 runoff events per year. About 60 to 70 percent of the annual runoff events occur in the summer season, as does 65 to 75 percent of the annual volume of measured runoff. Water samples collected on a lumped basis show generally high concentrations of suspended sediment, bacterial loading, and dissolved organics. Initial field treatment and exploratory laboratory studies of treatment methods indicate that three days is an optimal length of time for detention storage of runoff, reducing average pollutant concentrations to 62 mg /1 of turbidity, total coliform of 70 -3200 organisms per 100 mg /1, and 7 mg /1 of chemical oxygen demand. Simple laboratory treatment with alum and polyelectrolyte yielded an 80 percent reduction in COD, 90 percent reduction in bacterial loading, and appreciable clarification of the runoff samples. Continuing research should be conducted to utilize a longer data record for improving understanding of rainfall- runoff relations; to use distributed sampling within individual watershed areas to define specific pollutant source areas; and to incorporate economic and legal questions involved in the utilization of urban runoff in an arid area.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWater Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.sourceWater Resources Research Center. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectUrban hydrology -- Arizona -- Tucson.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Environmental aspects -- Arizona -- Tucson.en_US
dc.subjectUrban runoff -- Arizona -- Tucson.en_US
dc.titleHydrological and Environmental Controls on Water Management in Semiarid Urban Areasen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Research Centeren_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Research Centeren_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Water Resources Research Center collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Water Resources Research Center at The University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the Center, (520) 621-9591 or see http://wrrc.arizona.edu.en_US
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