Commercial Production of Wheat Grain Irrigated with Municipal Waste Water and Pump Water

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/305418
Title:
Commercial Production of Wheat Grain Irrigated with Municipal Waste Water and Pump Water
Author:
Day, A. D.; McFadyen, J. A.; Tucker, T. C.; Cluff, C. B.
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Sciences; Department of Plant Sciences; Department of Soils, Water, and Engineering; Water Resources Research Center
Citation:
Commercial Production of Wheat Grain Irrigated with Municipal Waste Water and Pump Water. 1979, 8 (3):403-406. Journal of Environmental Quality
Publisher:
American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America
Journal:
Journal of Environmental Quality
Issue Date:
Jul-1979
Description:
Full-text available from publisher's website only. (UA affiliates have access to link in Additional Links.)
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/305418
DOI:
doi:10.2134/jeq1979.00472425000800030027x
Additional Links:
http://doi:10.2134/jeq1979.00472425000800030027x
Abstract:
Experiments were conducted in southern Arizona to study the effects of irrigating wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with a mixture of pump water and waste water and with pump water alone on wheat growth, grain yield, grain quality, soil properties, and irrigation water quality. In small plot research, wheat irrigated with the pump water-waste water mixture produced taller plants, more heads per unit area, heavier seeds, higher grain yields, and higher straw yields than did wheat grown with only pump water. When large fields were compared, wheat grown with the pump water-waste water mixture had taller plants, more lodging, lower grain volume-weights, and higher grain yields than did wheat produced with pump water. The pH and exchangeable sodium of soil irrigated with pump water alone or the pump water-waste water mixture were similar. Soluble salts and nitrate-nitrogen were higher in soils irrigated with pump water than they were in soils irrigated with the pump water-waste water mixture. Extractable phosphorus was higher in soils irrigated with the pump water-waste water mixture than in soils irrigated with pump water. Total soluble salts and nitrate-nitrogen were higher in pump water than they were in the pump water-waste water mixture; however, the pump water-waste water mixture had higher levels of total nitrogen and phosphorus than did pump water. The higher grain yields obtained when wheat was irrigated with the pump water-waste water mixture than were produced when wheat was grown with pump water alone probably resulted from lower concentrations of soluble salts in the pump water-waste water mixture than were present in pump water.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
ISSN:
0047-2425

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDay, A. D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcFadyen, J. A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTucker, T. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCluff, C. B.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-15T01:17:41Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-15T01:17:41Z-
dc.date.issued1979-07-
dc.identifier.citationCommercial Production of Wheat Grain Irrigated with Municipal Waste Water and Pump Water. 1979, 8 (3):403-406. Journal of Environmental Qualityen_US
dc.identifier.issn0047-2425-
dc.identifier.doidoi:10.2134/jeq1979.00472425000800030027x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/305418-
dc.descriptionFull-text available from publisher's website only. (UA affiliates have access to link in Additional Links.)en_US
dc.description.abstractExperiments were conducted in southern Arizona to study the effects of irrigating wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with a mixture of pump water and waste water and with pump water alone on wheat growth, grain yield, grain quality, soil properties, and irrigation water quality. In small plot research, wheat irrigated with the pump water-waste water mixture produced taller plants, more heads per unit area, heavier seeds, higher grain yields, and higher straw yields than did wheat grown with only pump water. When large fields were compared, wheat grown with the pump water-waste water mixture had taller plants, more lodging, lower grain volume-weights, and higher grain yields than did wheat produced with pump water. The pH and exchangeable sodium of soil irrigated with pump water alone or the pump water-waste water mixture were similar. Soluble salts and nitrate-nitrogen were higher in soils irrigated with pump water than they were in soils irrigated with the pump water-waste water mixture. Extractable phosphorus was higher in soils irrigated with the pump water-waste water mixture than in soils irrigated with pump water. Total soluble salts and nitrate-nitrogen were higher in pump water than they were in the pump water-waste water mixture; however, the pump water-waste water mixture had higher levels of total nitrogen and phosphorus than did pump water. The higher grain yields obtained when wheat was irrigated with the pump water-waste water mixture than were produced when wheat was grown with pump water alone probably resulted from lower concentrations of soluble salts in the pump water-waste water mixture than were present in pump water.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of Americaen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi:10.2134/jeq1979.00472425000800030027xen_US
dc.titleCommercial Production of Wheat Grain Irrigated with Municipal Waste Water and Pump Wateren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Plant Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Plant Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Soils, Water, and Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Research Centeren_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Environmental Qualityen_US
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