Extended Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater by the Buckeye Irrigation Company: A Documentation of Effects

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/305399
Title:
Extended Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater by the Buckeye Irrigation Company: A Documentation of Effects
Author:
Cluff, C. B.; Tucker, T. C.; Day, A. D.; McFadyen, John A.; Sebenik, Paul G.
Affiliation:
Water Resources Research Center; Soils, Water and Engineering; Agronomy and Plant Genetics; Water Resources Research Center; Water Resources Research Center
Publisher:
Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
Sep-1980
Description:
Project Completion Report, OWRT Project No. A-050-ARIZ. / Agreement No. 14-31-0001-5003 / Project Dates: July 1974 - June 1976. / The work upon which this publication was based was supported in part by funds provided by the Office of Water Research and Technology (A-050-ARIZ), U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C., as authorized by the Water Research and Development Act of 1978.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/305399
Abstract:
INTRODUCTION: The use of treated sewage effluent by the Buckeye Irrigation Company began with 800 acre -feet in 1962 and had increased to 40,000 a.f. by 1968. The effluent was diverted by the Buckeye Irrigation Company from the Gila River approximately seven miles below the City of Phoenix 91st Avenue treatment plant, as it became available at their diversion point. Natural streamflow, used in earlier years, had virtually stopped due to upstream development except in heavy runoff years such as 1941. The ground water in the district of the Buckeye Irrigation Company is relatively high in dissolved solids. The quality of the treated effluent is better. In 1971 the company signed a 40 -year contract with Phoenix to assure its use of 30,000 a.f. of effluent per year. The effluent is mixed with native ground water to bring the total water applied on the 18,000-acre district up to approximately 90,000 a.f. (Halpenny, 1973). The treated effluent use by the Buckeye Irrigation Company is the largest in the State of Arizona and one of the largest land applications of treated effluent in the United States. It is unique in that it is being utilized by an irrigation district. Most other uses have been by city operated farms or private farms under a single ownership. In spite of its uniqueness the effects of effluent use by the Buckeye Irrigation District had not, prior to this research, been well documented. This documentation was made in order to improve the general knowledge needed to extend this type of use to other areas in the state and nation. "Widespread consideration and utilization of land application cannot be made until such time as adequate information concerning the technique involved is made available. The experience gained by those who have successfully utilized this wastewater management should be used... specific evaluation of established systems in the various climatic zones would appear to be more fruitful than new research installations for determining long term effects on soils, vegetation, ground water and the indigenous ecology..." (Sullivan, et al., 1973). During the two year research period most of the initial objectives were achieved. The original specific objectives were: 1. To identify changes during an extended period of application of treated wastewater to irrigated fields in: a. irrigation practices b. cropping patterns c. fertilization practices d. crop yield response and quality e. quality of irrigation water, and f. soil properties. 2. To make a preliminary evaluation of the effects of the use of effluent on ground-water conditions. 3. To make a preliminary evaluation of changes in water costs and farm profits.
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Sewage irrigation -- Arizona.; Irrigation farming.; Water reuse.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCluff, C. B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTucker, T. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDay, A. D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcFadyen, John A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSebenik, Paul G.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-14T20:17:17Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-14T20:17:17Z-
dc.date.issued1980-09-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/305399-
dc.descriptionProject Completion Report, OWRT Project No. A-050-ARIZ. / Agreement No. 14-31-0001-5003 / Project Dates: July 1974 - June 1976. / The work upon which this publication was based was supported in part by funds provided by the Office of Water Research and Technology (A-050-ARIZ), U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C., as authorized by the Water Research and Development Act of 1978.en_US
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: The use of treated sewage effluent by the Buckeye Irrigation Company began with 800 acre -feet in 1962 and had increased to 40,000 a.f. by 1968. The effluent was diverted by the Buckeye Irrigation Company from the Gila River approximately seven miles below the City of Phoenix 91st Avenue treatment plant, as it became available at their diversion point. Natural streamflow, used in earlier years, had virtually stopped due to upstream development except in heavy runoff years such as 1941. The ground water in the district of the Buckeye Irrigation Company is relatively high in dissolved solids. The quality of the treated effluent is better. In 1971 the company signed a 40 -year contract with Phoenix to assure its use of 30,000 a.f. of effluent per year. The effluent is mixed with native ground water to bring the total water applied on the 18,000-acre district up to approximately 90,000 a.f. (Halpenny, 1973). The treated effluent use by the Buckeye Irrigation Company is the largest in the State of Arizona and one of the largest land applications of treated effluent in the United States. It is unique in that it is being utilized by an irrigation district. Most other uses have been by city operated farms or private farms under a single ownership. In spite of its uniqueness the effects of effluent use by the Buckeye Irrigation District had not, prior to this research, been well documented. This documentation was made in order to improve the general knowledge needed to extend this type of use to other areas in the state and nation. "Widespread consideration and utilization of land application cannot be made until such time as adequate information concerning the technique involved is made available. The experience gained by those who have successfully utilized this wastewater management should be used... specific evaluation of established systems in the various climatic zones would appear to be more fruitful than new research installations for determining long term effects on soils, vegetation, ground water and the indigenous ecology..." (Sullivan, et al., 1973). During the two year research period most of the initial objectives were achieved. The original specific objectives were: 1. To identify changes during an extended period of application of treated wastewater to irrigated fields in: a. irrigation practices b. cropping patterns c. fertilization practices d. crop yield response and quality e. quality of irrigation water, and f. soil properties. 2. To make a preliminary evaluation of the effects of the use of effluent on ground-water conditions. 3. To make a preliminary evaluation of changes in water costs and farm profits.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWater Resources Research Center, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.sourceWater Resources Research Center. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectSewage irrigation -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectIrrigation farming.en_US
dc.subjectWater reuse.en_US
dc.titleExtended Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater by the Buckeye Irrigation Company: A Documentation of Effectsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Research Centeren_US
dc.contributor.departmentSoils, Water and Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentAgronomy and Plant Geneticsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Research Centeren_US
dc.contributor.departmentWater Resources Research Centeren_US
dc.description.noteOne copyrighted article, Commercial Production of Wheat Grain Irrigated with Municipal Waste Water and Pump Water, removed from Appendix A.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Water Resources Research Center collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Water Resources Research Center at The University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the Center, (520) 621-9591 or see http://wrrc.arizona.edu.en_US
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