Theory and Practice of Dynamic Voltage/Frequency Scaling in the High Performance Computing Environment

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/305368
Title:
Theory and Practice of Dynamic Voltage/Frequency Scaling in the High Performance Computing Environment
Author:
Rountree, Barry
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation provides a comprehensive overview of the theory and practice of Dynamic Voltage/Frequency Scaling (DVFS) in the High Performance Computing (HPC) environment. We summarize the overall problem as follows: how can the same level of computational performance be achieved using less electrical power? Equivalently, how can computational performance be increased using the same amount of electrical power? In this dissertation we present performance and architecture models of DVFS as well as the Adagio runtime system. The performance model recasts the question as an optimization problem that we solve using linear programming, thus establishing a bound on potential energy savings. The architectural model provides a low-level explanation of how memory bus and CPU clock frequencies interact to determine execution time. Using insights provided from these models, we have designed and implemented the Adagio runtime system. This system realizes near-optimal energy savings on real-world scientific applications without the use of training runs or source code modification, and under the constraint that only negligible delay will be tolerated by the user. This work has opened up several new avenues of research, and we conclude by enumerating these.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
high Performance Computing; Computer Science; DVFS; DVS; Maison des pays iberiques
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Computer Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lowenthal, David K.
Committee Chair:
Lowenthal, David K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTheory and Practice of Dynamic Voltage/Frequency Scaling in the High Performance Computing Environmenten_US
dc.creatorRountree, Barryen_US
dc.contributor.authorRountree, Barryen_US
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation provides a comprehensive overview of the theory and practice of Dynamic Voltage/Frequency Scaling (DVFS) in the High Performance Computing (HPC) environment. We summarize the overall problem as follows: how can the same level of computational performance be achieved using less electrical power? Equivalently, how can computational performance be increased using the same amount of electrical power? In this dissertation we present performance and architecture models of DVFS as well as the Adagio runtime system. The performance model recasts the question as an optimization problem that we solve using linear programming, thus establishing a bound on potential energy savings. The architectural model provides a low-level explanation of how memory bus and CPU clock frequencies interact to determine execution time. Using insights provided from these models, we have designed and implemented the Adagio runtime system. This system realizes near-optimal energy savings on real-world scientific applications without the use of training runs or source code modification, and under the constraint that only negligible delay will be tolerated by the user. This work has opened up several new avenues of research, and we conclude by enumerating these.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjecthigh Performance Computingen_US
dc.subjectComputer Scienceen_US
dc.subjectDVFSen_US
dc.subjectDVSen_US
dc.subjectMaison des pays iberiquesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComputer Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLowenthal, David K.en_US
dc.contributor.chairLowenthal, David K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberde Supinski, Bronis R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFunk, Shelbyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHartman, Johnen_US
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