Effective Combination of Syngeneic HCT with CRCL Vaccination to Treat BCR-ABL+ Leukemia and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Regulatory T Cells Suppress Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Immunity in Patients with Active Disease

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/305143
Title:
Effective Combination of Syngeneic HCT with CRCL Vaccination to Treat BCR-ABL+ Leukemia and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Regulatory T Cells Suppress Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Immunity in Patients with Active Disease
Author:
Chen, Xinchun
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Dissertation Not Available (per Author's Request); UA Affiliates can find item in ProQuest Dissertations database
Abstract:
Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a clonal hematopoetic stem cell disorder characterized by proliferation of cells expressing BCR-ABL fusion protein. In the BCR-ABL+ leukemia murine model, 12B1, we explored the therapeutic applicability of chaperone-rich cell lysate (CRCL) in the context of syngeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat pre-existing leukemia. Our results demonstrate that tumor growth is significantly delayed in mice receiving syngeneic HCT from 12B1 tumor CRCL immunized donors compared to animals receiving HCT from non-immunized donors. CRCL immunization post-immune HCT further hindered tumor growth when compared to immune HCT without post-transplant vaccination. The magnitude of the immune response was consistent with the anti-tumor effects observed in vivo. We also demonstrated that cured mice had developed long-term tumor specific immunity against 12B1 tumor cells. In addition, we documented that both T cells and NK cells contributed to the anti-tumor effect of CRCL vaccination as depletion of either subset hampered tumor growth delay. Thus, our results suggest that CRCL represents a promising vaccine capable of generating specific immune responses. This anti-tumor immunity can be effectively transferred to a host via HCT and further enhanced post-HCT with additional tumor CRCL immunizations.CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) play a central role in the prevention of autoimmunity and in the control of immune responses by down-regulating the function of effector CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. The role of Treg in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and persistence is inadequately documented. Therefore, the current study was designed to determine whether CD4+CD25+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells may modulate immunity against human tuberculosis (TB). Ourresults indicate that the number of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg increases in the blood or at the site of infection in active TB patients. The frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg in pleural fluid inversely correlates with local MTB-specific immunity(p<0.002). These CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T lymphocytes isolated from the blood and pleural fluid are capable of suppressing MTB-specific IFN-γ and IL-10 production in TB patients. Therefore, CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg expanded in TB patients suppress Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunity and may therefore contribute to the pathogenesis of human TB.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Mycobacterium tuberculosis; regulatory T cells; immunopathogenesis; chronic myelogenous leukemia; chaperone-rich cell lysate; hematopoietic cell transplantation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Microbiology and Immunology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Katsanis, Emmanuel

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffective Combination of Syngeneic HCT with CRCL Vaccination to Treat BCR-ABL+ Leukemia and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Regulatory T Cells Suppress Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Immunity in Patients with Active Diseaseen_US
dc.creatorChen, Xinchunen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Xinchunen_US
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseDissertation Not Available (per Author's Request); UA Affiliates can find item in ProQuest Dissertations databaseen_US
dc.description.abstractChronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a clonal hematopoetic stem cell disorder characterized by proliferation of cells expressing BCR-ABL fusion protein. In the BCR-ABL+ leukemia murine model, 12B1, we explored the therapeutic applicability of chaperone-rich cell lysate (CRCL) in the context of syngeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat pre-existing leukemia. Our results demonstrate that tumor growth is significantly delayed in mice receiving syngeneic HCT from 12B1 tumor CRCL immunized donors compared to animals receiving HCT from non-immunized donors. CRCL immunization post-immune HCT further hindered tumor growth when compared to immune HCT without post-transplant vaccination. The magnitude of the immune response was consistent with the anti-tumor effects observed in vivo. We also demonstrated that cured mice had developed long-term tumor specific immunity against 12B1 tumor cells. In addition, we documented that both T cells and NK cells contributed to the anti-tumor effect of CRCL vaccination as depletion of either subset hampered tumor growth delay. Thus, our results suggest that CRCL represents a promising vaccine capable of generating specific immune responses. This anti-tumor immunity can be effectively transferred to a host via HCT and further enhanced post-HCT with additional tumor CRCL immunizations.CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) play a central role in the prevention of autoimmunity and in the control of immune responses by down-regulating the function of effector CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. The role of Treg in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and persistence is inadequately documented. Therefore, the current study was designed to determine whether CD4+CD25+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells may modulate immunity against human tuberculosis (TB). Ourresults indicate that the number of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg increases in the blood or at the site of infection in active TB patients. The frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg in pleural fluid inversely correlates with local MTB-specific immunity(p<0.002). These CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T lymphocytes isolated from the blood and pleural fluid are capable of suppressing MTB-specific IFN-γ and IL-10 production in TB patients. Therefore, CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg expanded in TB patients suppress Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunity and may therefore contribute to the pathogenesis of human TB.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectMycobacterium tuberculosisen_US
dc.subjectregulatory T cellsen_US
dc.subjectimmunopathogenesisen_US
dc.subjectchronic myelogenous leukemiaen_US
dc.subjectchaperone-rich cell lysateen_US
dc.subjecthematopoietic cell transplantationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology and Immunologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKatsanis, Emmanuelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKatsanis, Emmanuelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAkporiaye, Emmanuel T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBernstein, Harrisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStopeck, Alison T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAdam, Rodney D.en_US
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