Dendrochronological and Paleoecological Evidence for Holocene Climatic Fluctuations in the White Mountains, California

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/302930
Title:
Dendrochronological and Paleoecological Evidence for Holocene Climatic Fluctuations in the White Mountains, California
Author:
LaMarche, Valmore C., Jr.
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona
Citation:
LaMarche, V. C., Jr. Dendrochronological and Paleoecological Evidence for Holocene Climatic Fluctuations in the White Mountains, California. In: Dendrochronologie und Postglaziale Klimaschwankungen in Europa, edited by B. Frenzel, pp. 151-55. Erdwissenschaftliche Forschung, Vol. 13, Franz Steiner Verlag, Wiesbaden.
Publisher:
Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
20-May-1974
Description:
Author's manuscript.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/302930
Abstract:
The bristlecone pines are of exceptional interest for studies of past environmental changes and especially of climatic changes. Individual trees of these species attain ages approaching 5000 years, and the wood of dead trees can remain intact for several thousand years more. These characteristics permit the development of very long tree-ring chronologies. Furthermore, ecological and environmental changes are shown by the age structure of the forest and by presence of logs, stumps, and wood remnants in areas that are now unforested. The Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva D. K. Bailey) and the closely related Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine (P. aristata Engelm.) are widely distributed in the high mountains of western United States. However, the largest number of old trees and the greatest climatic sensitivity of ring -width characteristics and of distributional patterns are found at the western limits of the Great Basin species - in the White Mountains of eastern California.
Language:
en_US

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLaMarche, Valmore C., Jr.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-08T00:41:13Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-08T00:41:13Z-
dc.date.issued1974-05-20-
dc.identifier.citationLaMarche, V. C., Jr. Dendrochronological and Paleoecological Evidence for Holocene Climatic Fluctuations in the White Mountains, California. In: Dendrochronologie und Postglaziale Klimaschwankungen in Europa, edited by B. Frenzel, pp. 151-55. Erdwissenschaftliche Forschung, Vol. 13, Franz Steiner Verlag, Wiesbaden.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/302930-
dc.descriptionAuthor's manuscript.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe bristlecone pines are of exceptional interest for studies of past environmental changes and especially of climatic changes. Individual trees of these species attain ages approaching 5000 years, and the wood of dead trees can remain intact for several thousand years more. These characteristics permit the development of very long tree-ring chronologies. Furthermore, ecological and environmental changes are shown by the age structure of the forest and by presence of logs, stumps, and wood remnants in areas that are now unforested. The Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva D. K. Bailey) and the closely related Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine (P. aristata Engelm.) are widely distributed in the high mountains of western United States. However, the largest number of old trees and the greatest climatic sensitivity of ring -width characteristics and of distributional patterns are found at the western limits of the Great Basin species - in the White Mountains of eastern California.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherLaboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceLaboratory of Tree-Ring Research Archives. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titleDendrochronological and Paleoecological Evidence for Holocene Climatic Fluctuations in the White Mountains, Californiaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Natural History Reports collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the Lab's Curator, (520) 621-1608 or see http://ltrr.arizona.edu/collection.en_US
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