Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301767
Title:
Autofluorescence-Based Diagnostic UV Imaging of Tissues and Cells
Author:
Renkoski, Timothy Eli
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 01-Nov-2013
Abstract:
Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, and its early diagnosis is critical to improving treatment options and patient outcomes. In autofluorescence (AF) imaging, light of controlled wavelengths is projected onto tissue, absorbed by specific molecules, and re-emitted at longer wavelengths. Images of re-emitted light are used together with spectral information to infer tissue functional information and diagnosis. This dissertation describes AF imaging studies of three different organs using data collected from fresh human surgical specimens. In the ovary study, illumination was at 365 nm, and images were captured at 8 emission wavelengths. Measurements from a multispectral imaging system and fiber optic probe were used to map tissue diagnosis at every image pixel. For the colon and pancreas studies, instrumentation was developed extending AF imaging capability to sub-300 nm excitation. Images excited in the deep UV revealed tryptophan and protein content which are believed to change with disease state. Several excitation wavelength bands from 280 nm to 440 nm were investigated. Microscopic AF images collected in the pancreas study included both cultured and primary cells. Several findings are reported. A method of transforming fiber optic probe spectra for direct comparison with imager spectra was devised. Normalization of AF data by green reflectance data was found useful in correcting hemoglobin absorption. Ratio images, both AF and reflectance, were formulated to highlight growths in the colon. Novel tryptophan AF images were found less useful for colon diagnostics than the new ratio techniques. Microscopic tryptophan AF images produce useful visualization of cellular protein content, but their diagnostic value requires further study.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
cancer; fluorescence; medical imaging; multispectral; ultraviolet; Optical Sciences; autofluorescence
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Utzinger, Urs

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAutofluorescence-Based Diagnostic UV Imaging of Tissues and Cellsen_US
dc.creatorRenkoski, Timothy Elien_US
dc.contributor.authorRenkoski, Timothy Elien_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 01-Nov-2013en_US
dc.description.abstractCancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, and its early diagnosis is critical to improving treatment options and patient outcomes. In autofluorescence (AF) imaging, light of controlled wavelengths is projected onto tissue, absorbed by specific molecules, and re-emitted at longer wavelengths. Images of re-emitted light are used together with spectral information to infer tissue functional information and diagnosis. This dissertation describes AF imaging studies of three different organs using data collected from fresh human surgical specimens. In the ovary study, illumination was at 365 nm, and images were captured at 8 emission wavelengths. Measurements from a multispectral imaging system and fiber optic probe were used to map tissue diagnosis at every image pixel. For the colon and pancreas studies, instrumentation was developed extending AF imaging capability to sub-300 nm excitation. Images excited in the deep UV revealed tryptophan and protein content which are believed to change with disease state. Several excitation wavelength bands from 280 nm to 440 nm were investigated. Microscopic AF images collected in the pancreas study included both cultured and primary cells. Several findings are reported. A method of transforming fiber optic probe spectra for direct comparison with imager spectra was devised. Normalization of AF data by green reflectance data was found useful in correcting hemoglobin absorption. Ratio images, both AF and reflectance, were formulated to highlight growths in the colon. Novel tryptophan AF images were found less useful for colon diagnostics than the new ratio techniques. Microscopic tryptophan AF images produce useful visualization of cellular protein content, but their diagnostic value requires further study.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectcanceren_US
dc.subjectfluorescenceen_US
dc.subjectmedical imagingen_US
dc.subjectmultispectralen_US
dc.subjectultravioleten_US
dc.subjectOptical Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectautofluorescenceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorUtzinger, Ursen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBanerjee, Bhaskaren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGmitro, Arthuren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLynch, Ronalden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUtzinger, Ursen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.