Multi-Modality Endoscopic Imaging for the Detection of Colorectal Cancer

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301761
Title:
Multi-Modality Endoscopic Imaging for the Detection of Colorectal Cancer
Author:
Wall, Richard Andrew
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 07-Feb-2014
Abstract:
Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging method that is considered the optical analog to ultrasound, using the technique of optical interferometry to construct two-dimensional depth-resolved images of tissue microstructure. With a resolution on the order of 10 μm and a penetration depth of 1-2 mm in highly scattering tissue, fiber optics-coupled OCT is an ideal modality for the inspection of the mouse colon with its miniaturization capabilities. In the present study, the complementary modalities laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), which offers information on the biochemical makeup of the tissue, and surface magnifying chromoendoscopy, which offers high contrast surface visualization, are combined with OCT in endoscopic imaging systems for the greater specificity and sensitivity in the differentiation between normal and neoplastic tissue, and for the visualization of biomarkers which are indicative of early events in colorectal carcinogenesis. Oblique incidence reflectometry (OIR) also offers advantages, allowing the calculation of bulk tissue optical properties for use as a diagnostic tool. The study was broken up into three specific sections. First, a dual-modality OCTLIF imaging system was designed, capable of focusing light over 325-1300 nm using a reflective distal optics design. A dual-modality fluorescence-based SMC-OCT system was then designed and constructed, capable of resolving the stained mucosal crypt structure of the in vivo mouse colon. The SMC-OCT instrument's OIR capabilities were then modeled, as a modified version of the probe was used measure tissue scattering and absorption coefficients.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
laser induced fluorescence; mouse colon; oblique incidence reflectometry; optical coherence tomography; surface magnifying chromoendoscopy; Optical Sciences; endoscope
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barton, Jennifer K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMulti-Modality Endoscopic Imaging for the Detection of Colorectal Canceren_US
dc.creatorWall, Richard Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.authorWall, Richard Andrewen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 07-Feb-2014en_US
dc.description.abstractOptical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging method that is considered the optical analog to ultrasound, using the technique of optical interferometry to construct two-dimensional depth-resolved images of tissue microstructure. With a resolution on the order of 10 μm and a penetration depth of 1-2 mm in highly scattering tissue, fiber optics-coupled OCT is an ideal modality for the inspection of the mouse colon with its miniaturization capabilities. In the present study, the complementary modalities laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), which offers information on the biochemical makeup of the tissue, and surface magnifying chromoendoscopy, which offers high contrast surface visualization, are combined with OCT in endoscopic imaging systems for the greater specificity and sensitivity in the differentiation between normal and neoplastic tissue, and for the visualization of biomarkers which are indicative of early events in colorectal carcinogenesis. Oblique incidence reflectometry (OIR) also offers advantages, allowing the calculation of bulk tissue optical properties for use as a diagnostic tool. The study was broken up into three specific sections. First, a dual-modality OCTLIF imaging system was designed, capable of focusing light over 325-1300 nm using a reflective distal optics design. A dual-modality fluorescence-based SMC-OCT system was then designed and constructed, capable of resolving the stained mucosal crypt structure of the in vivo mouse colon. The SMC-OCT instrument's OIR capabilities were then modeled, as a modified version of the probe was used measure tissue scattering and absorption coefficients.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectlaser induced fluorescenceen_US
dc.subjectmouse colonen_US
dc.subjectoblique incidence reflectometryen_US
dc.subjectoptical coherence tomographyen_US
dc.subjectsurface magnifying chromoendoscopyen_US
dc.subjectOptical Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectendoscopeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBarton, Jennifer K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGmitro, Arthur F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchwiegerling, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarton, Jennifer K.en_US
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