Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301700
Title:
Resonant Cycles and Traffic Signal Performance
Author:
Ladrón de Guevara, Felipe
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In recent years, a new principle in signal coordination called resonant cycles emerged. Resonant cycles are single cycle lengths for two-way arterials that are robust and provide consistent performance over a range of traffic volumes. Resonant cycles had only been evaluated on a hypothetical network. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of resonant cycles and signal performance using data gathered from two actual corridors, State Route 77 and 22nd Street in Tucson, AZ., it also provides an application guide that can be found in Figures 11 to 18. Resonant cycles were observed on both corridors for low volume and moderate volume conditions. The benefit of resonant cycles is not having the need of altering the cycle length when traffic volumes change. In this study, resonant cycles resulted in reductions of approximately 9% delay and 20% number of stops. The findings indicated that resonant cycles could be easily found on corridors under low volume scenarios. Also, leading left turn treatments seem to shorten the length of resonant cycles on the study segment of 22nd Street. This research utilized simulation results to conduct a full statistical analysis of the variables affecting signal performance. Prior to this study, research included before and after studies to evaluate signal performance. Statistically significant variables include type of timing, left-turn treatment and type of phasing. Actuated operations, lagging left turn treatments and 8-phase signals are more likely to improve the corridor performance index by 5.5%, 4.0%, and 2.0%, respectively.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Cycle; Performance; Resonant; Signal; Traffic; Civil Engineering; Coordination
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Civil Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hickman, Mark D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleResonant Cycles and Traffic Signal Performanceen_US
dc.creatorLadrón de Guevara, Felipeen_US
dc.contributor.authorLadrón de Guevara, Felipeen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, a new principle in signal coordination called resonant cycles emerged. Resonant cycles are single cycle lengths for two-way arterials that are robust and provide consistent performance over a range of traffic volumes. Resonant cycles had only been evaluated on a hypothetical network. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of resonant cycles and signal performance using data gathered from two actual corridors, State Route 77 and 22nd Street in Tucson, AZ., it also provides an application guide that can be found in Figures 11 to 18. Resonant cycles were observed on both corridors for low volume and moderate volume conditions. The benefit of resonant cycles is not having the need of altering the cycle length when traffic volumes change. In this study, resonant cycles resulted in reductions of approximately 9% delay and 20% number of stops. The findings indicated that resonant cycles could be easily found on corridors under low volume scenarios. Also, leading left turn treatments seem to shorten the length of resonant cycles on the study segment of 22nd Street. This research utilized simulation results to conduct a full statistical analysis of the variables affecting signal performance. Prior to this study, research included before and after studies to evaluate signal performance. Statistically significant variables include type of timing, left-turn treatment and type of phasing. Actuated operations, lagging left turn treatments and 8-phase signals are more likely to improve the corridor performance index by 5.5%, 4.0%, and 2.0%, respectively.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCycleen_US
dc.subjectPerformanceen_US
dc.subjectResonanten_US
dc.subjectSignalen_US
dc.subjectTrafficen_US
dc.subjectCivil Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectCoordinationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHickman, Mark D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHead, Kenneth L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChiu, Yi-Changen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBailey, Kerionen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHickman, Mark D.en_US
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