Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301698
Title:
Essays on Labor Economics and Entrepreneurship
Author:
Córdova González, Karina Elizabeth
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is composed of two essays that relate topics in the fields of labor economics, migration, experimental economics and entrepreneurship, taking into account a gender perspective. The first essay examines collective remittances, those sent by migrants' associations to be invested in community projects in their hometowns, matched by governmental funds through the Mexican program 3x1 Para Migrantes. This study evaluates the effect of collective remittances on the probability of wanting to migrate, being employed and in the labor force, and on the amount of hours worked of adult men and women in 2002 and 2005 in Mexico. Collective remittances have a positive, albeit modest, impact on the employment and labor force participation of adults in participant municipalities, but no effect on the preferences to migrate. Important differences are observed by type of project executed and by gender and age cohort, with younger men and women benefiting the most from investments in schools and sports facilities. The second essay conducts a series of laboratory experiments to test the hypothesis that, while stress worsens entrepreneurial choices and outcomes for all, it does so more for women than men. Results show that the effects of stress on choice and performance are more negative for women. Experimentally-induced stress causes more long-lasting productivity losses for women, and additional losses for making choices that do not maximize income given one's productivity. The negative treatment effect on women's productivity, choice quality, and earnings is driven by women who experienced negative life events. The mechanisms that affect choices also differ by gender. Men are more likely to present inconsistencies during a series of entrepreneurial decisions, and women to have inaccurate beliefs about their performance.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
entrepreneurial choices; gender effects; laboratory experiments; labor markets; local development; Economics; collective remittances
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Economics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Oaxaca, Ronald L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEssays on Labor Economics and Entrepreneurshipen_US
dc.creatorCórdova González, Karina Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorCórdova González, Karina Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is composed of two essays that relate topics in the fields of labor economics, migration, experimental economics and entrepreneurship, taking into account a gender perspective. The first essay examines collective remittances, those sent by migrants' associations to be invested in community projects in their hometowns, matched by governmental funds through the Mexican program 3x1 Para Migrantes. This study evaluates the effect of collective remittances on the probability of wanting to migrate, being employed and in the labor force, and on the amount of hours worked of adult men and women in 2002 and 2005 in Mexico. Collective remittances have a positive, albeit modest, impact on the employment and labor force participation of adults in participant municipalities, but no effect on the preferences to migrate. Important differences are observed by type of project executed and by gender and age cohort, with younger men and women benefiting the most from investments in schools and sports facilities. The second essay conducts a series of laboratory experiments to test the hypothesis that, while stress worsens entrepreneurial choices and outcomes for all, it does so more for women than men. Results show that the effects of stress on choice and performance are more negative for women. Experimentally-induced stress causes more long-lasting productivity losses for women, and additional losses for making choices that do not maximize income given one's productivity. The negative treatment effect on women's productivity, choice quality, and earnings is driven by women who experienced negative life events. The mechanisms that affect choices also differ by gender. Men are more likely to present inconsistencies during a series of entrepreneurial decisions, and women to have inaccurate beliefs about their performance.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectentrepreneurial choicesen_US
dc.subjectgender effectsen_US
dc.subjectlaboratory experimentsen_US
dc.subjectlabor marketsen_US
dc.subjectlocal developmenten_US
dc.subjectEconomicsen_US
dc.subjectcollective remittancesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOaxaca, Ronald L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFishback, Price V.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRahman, Tauhiduren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOaxaca, Ronald L.en_US
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