Cultural Ecosystem Services as a Framework for Evaluating Wilderness Values in Public Land Settings

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301660
Title:
Cultural Ecosystem Services as a Framework for Evaluating Wilderness Values in Public Land Settings
Author:
Sharp, Christopher John
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Wilderness Act of 1964 states the purpose of the National Wilderness Preservation System is "to secure for the American people of present and future generations the benefits of an enduring resource of wilderness." But, how to accomplish this mandate is a complex task. The application of the Ecosystem Services model is ideal for facilitating the complex duel goals of securing benefits and preserving wilderness resources. Ecosystem Services directly addresses benefits derived from a landscape, even if the specifics of the benefits change over time. This dissertation employs Ecosystem Services as a framework to provide a more complete understanding of wilderness values. In three separate studies conducted in wilderness areas in Southern Arizona, (Assessing Border-Related Human Impacts at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Linking Visitor Flows and Patterns of Use with General Management Planning in Saguaro National Park and Monitoring and Estimating Visitor Use at the Madrona Ranger Station and Surrounding Landscape) elements of Cultural Ecosystem Services (CES) are illuminated.I found that the more holistic epistemology of Ecosystem Services allowed for the inclusion of better scientific data in the management process. The inclusion of quantitative, repeatable, defensible studies of user behavior in wildlands allows for dynamic management options that are rooted in real conditions (mutable, undesirable or unique). Specifically Cultural Ecosystem Services address the value and significance of the unique landscape of wilderness. Previous models for wildland management sought specific metrics of carrying capacity to limit use and control impact. Ecosystem Services combines diverse scientific fields to provide real understanding of the landscape. The addition of ES to manager's decision processes allows for better understanding of real conditions.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Cultural Ecosystem Services; southwest desert; Wilderness; Natural Resources; CES
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gimblett, H. Randy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCultural Ecosystem Services as a Framework for Evaluating Wilderness Values in Public Land Settingsen_US
dc.creatorSharp, Christopher Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorSharp, Christopher Johnen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Wilderness Act of 1964 states the purpose of the National Wilderness Preservation System is "to secure for the American people of present and future generations the benefits of an enduring resource of wilderness." But, how to accomplish this mandate is a complex task. The application of the Ecosystem Services model is ideal for facilitating the complex duel goals of securing benefits and preserving wilderness resources. Ecosystem Services directly addresses benefits derived from a landscape, even if the specifics of the benefits change over time. This dissertation employs Ecosystem Services as a framework to provide a more complete understanding of wilderness values. In three separate studies conducted in wilderness areas in Southern Arizona, (Assessing Border-Related Human Impacts at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Linking Visitor Flows and Patterns of Use with General Management Planning in Saguaro National Park and Monitoring and Estimating Visitor Use at the Madrona Ranger Station and Surrounding Landscape) elements of Cultural Ecosystem Services (CES) are illuminated.I found that the more holistic epistemology of Ecosystem Services allowed for the inclusion of better scientific data in the management process. The inclusion of quantitative, repeatable, defensible studies of user behavior in wildlands allows for dynamic management options that are rooted in real conditions (mutable, undesirable or unique). Specifically Cultural Ecosystem Services address the value and significance of the unique landscape of wilderness. Previous models for wildland management sought specific metrics of carrying capacity to limit use and control impact. Ecosystem Services combines diverse scientific fields to provide real understanding of the landscape. The addition of ES to manager's decision processes allows for better understanding of real conditions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCultural Ecosystem Servicesen_US
dc.subjectsouthwest deserten_US
dc.subjectWildernessen_US
dc.subjectNatural Resourcesen_US
dc.subjectCESen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGimblett, H. Randyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuertin, D. Phillipen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberde Steiguer, J. E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGimblett, H. Randyen_US
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