Drought Monitoring with Remote Sensing Based Land Surface Phenology Applications and Validation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301553
Title:
Drought Monitoring with Remote Sensing Based Land Surface Phenology Applications and Validation
Author:
El Vilaly, Mohamed Abd salam Mohamdy
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Droughts are a recurrent part of our climate, and are still considered to be one of the most complex and least understood of all natural hazards in terms of their impact on the environment. In recent years drought has become more common and more severe across the world. For more than a decade, the US southwest has faced extensive and persistent drought conditions that have impacted vegetation communities and local water resources. The focus of this work is achieving a better understanding of the impact of drought on the lands of the Hopi Tribe and Navajo Nation, situated in the Northeastern corner of Arizona. This research explores the application of remote sensing data and geospatial tools in two studies to monitor drought impacts on vegetation productivity. In both studies we used land surface phenometrics as the data tool. In a third related study, I have compared satellite-derived land surface phenology (LSP) to field observations of crop stages at the Maricopa Agricultural Center to achieve a better understanding of the temporal sensitivity of satellite derived phenology of vegetation and understand their accuracy as a tool for monitoring change. The first study explores long-term vegetation productivity responses to drought. The paper develops a framework for drought monitoring and assessment by integrating land cover, climate, and topographical data with LSP. The objective of the framework is to detect long-term vegetation changes and trends in the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) related productivity. The second study examines the major driving forces of vegetation dynamics in order to provide valuable spatial information related to inter-annual variability in vegetation productivity for mitigating drought impacts. The third study tests the accuracy of remote sensing-derived LSP by comparing them to the actual seasonal phases of crop growth. This provides a way to compare and validate the various LSP algorithms, and more crucially, helps to characterize the remote sensing-based metrics that contrast with the actual biological phenophases of the crops. These studies demonstrate how remote sensing data and simple statistical tools can be used to assess drought effects on vegetation productivity and to inform about land conditions, as well as to better understand the accuracy of satellite derived LSP.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Drought; Hopi; Land Surface Phenology; Navajo; Vegetation Index; Arid Lands Resource Sciences; Crops
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Arid Lands Resource Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Marsh, Stuart E.; Didan, Kamel

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDrought Monitoring with Remote Sensing Based Land Surface Phenology Applications and Validationen_US
dc.creatorEl Vilaly, Mohamed Abd salam Mohamdyen_US
dc.contributor.authorEl Vilaly, Mohamed Abd salam Mohamdyen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDroughts are a recurrent part of our climate, and are still considered to be one of the most complex and least understood of all natural hazards in terms of their impact on the environment. In recent years drought has become more common and more severe across the world. For more than a decade, the US southwest has faced extensive and persistent drought conditions that have impacted vegetation communities and local water resources. The focus of this work is achieving a better understanding of the impact of drought on the lands of the Hopi Tribe and Navajo Nation, situated in the Northeastern corner of Arizona. This research explores the application of remote sensing data and geospatial tools in two studies to monitor drought impacts on vegetation productivity. In both studies we used land surface phenometrics as the data tool. In a third related study, I have compared satellite-derived land surface phenology (LSP) to field observations of crop stages at the Maricopa Agricultural Center to achieve a better understanding of the temporal sensitivity of satellite derived phenology of vegetation and understand their accuracy as a tool for monitoring change. The first study explores long-term vegetation productivity responses to drought. The paper develops a framework for drought monitoring and assessment by integrating land cover, climate, and topographical data with LSP. The objective of the framework is to detect long-term vegetation changes and trends in the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) related productivity. The second study examines the major driving forces of vegetation dynamics in order to provide valuable spatial information related to inter-annual variability in vegetation productivity for mitigating drought impacts. The third study tests the accuracy of remote sensing-derived LSP by comparing them to the actual seasonal phases of crop growth. This provides a way to compare and validate the various LSP algorithms, and more crucially, helps to characterize the remote sensing-based metrics that contrast with the actual biological phenophases of the crops. These studies demonstrate how remote sensing data and simple statistical tools can be used to assess drought effects on vegetation productivity and to inform about land conditions, as well as to better understand the accuracy of satellite derived LSP.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectDroughten_US
dc.subjectHopien_US
dc.subjectLand Surface Phenologyen_US
dc.subjectNavajoen_US
dc.subjectVegetation Indexen_US
dc.subjectArid Lands Resource Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectCropsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArid Lands Resource Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMarsh, Stuart E.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorDidan, Kamelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCrimmins, Michael A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHutchinson, Charles F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuertin, David P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarsh, Stuart E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDidan, Kamelen_US
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