Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301552
Title:
Mind the Gap: The Dynamics and Work of Aging and Caring at Home
Author:
Penney, Lauren
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In the United States, a growing proportion of the population is aged 65 and older. Associated with this demographic transition is a rise in the number of people who are aging with chronic disease. While there is a cultural ideal for older adults to remain in the community and out of institutional settings ("aging in place"), there is little recognition of the work and experience of trying to accomplish this. In the following papers, I draw on 12 months of ethnographic research in the Southwest US to describe the work of "aging in place." As a starting point, I use Medicare-funded home health care (HHC), which stands at the crossroads of acute-based institutional care and custodial, long-term care. In the first paper, using definitions of place from cultural geography, I explore the work of aging from the perspective of chronically ill older adult HHC users. I illustrate how bodies, practices, and places shift as processes of disease and medicalization inscribe them with risk, and the ways in which people accept, resist, and negotiate these changes. The second paper extends the work on audit culture to describe how Medicare's audit system has structured the organization and practice of HHC, and how this has reinforced the commodification of patients. I note how HHC nurses can draw on personal and professional logics in their documentation practices as a means of resisting rationalizing forces and opening up eligibility for care. The third paper uses case studies to push the literature on family caregiver burden to include the fraught, yet highly meaning-filled experience of caregiving. The cases show the difficulties and ambivalence in providing care to a chronically ill family member. Throughout these articles, underlying the tensions, uncertainties, and gaps I explore questions about what type of care is needed, who is worthy of care, and how responsibilities are distributed. I focus on how people's worlds and work are structured by larger scale social, cultural, and economic forces, and attend to the ways in which they reproduce, contend, and negotiate these forces from their unique positions, in effort to protect what they value.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
audit culture; health policy; medical anthropology; place; Anthropology; aging
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nichter, Mimi

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMind the Gap: The Dynamics and Work of Aging and Caring at Homeen_US
dc.creatorPenney, Laurenen_US
dc.contributor.authorPenney, Laurenen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the United States, a growing proportion of the population is aged 65 and older. Associated with this demographic transition is a rise in the number of people who are aging with chronic disease. While there is a cultural ideal for older adults to remain in the community and out of institutional settings ("aging in place"), there is little recognition of the work and experience of trying to accomplish this. In the following papers, I draw on 12 months of ethnographic research in the Southwest US to describe the work of "aging in place." As a starting point, I use Medicare-funded home health care (HHC), which stands at the crossroads of acute-based institutional care and custodial, long-term care. In the first paper, using definitions of place from cultural geography, I explore the work of aging from the perspective of chronically ill older adult HHC users. I illustrate how bodies, practices, and places shift as processes of disease and medicalization inscribe them with risk, and the ways in which people accept, resist, and negotiate these changes. The second paper extends the work on audit culture to describe how Medicare's audit system has structured the organization and practice of HHC, and how this has reinforced the commodification of patients. I note how HHC nurses can draw on personal and professional logics in their documentation practices as a means of resisting rationalizing forces and opening up eligibility for care. The third paper uses case studies to push the literature on family caregiver burden to include the fraught, yet highly meaning-filled experience of caregiving. The cases show the difficulties and ambivalence in providing care to a chronically ill family member. Throughout these articles, underlying the tensions, uncertainties, and gaps I explore questions about what type of care is needed, who is worthy of care, and how responsibilities are distributed. I focus on how people's worlds and work are structured by larger scale social, cultural, and economic forces, and attend to the ways in which they reproduce, contend, and negotiate these forces from their unique positions, in effort to protect what they value.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectaudit cultureen_US
dc.subjecthealth policyen_US
dc.subjectmedical anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectplaceen_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectagingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNichter, Mimien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNichter, Mimien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAustin, Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShaw, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNichter, Marken_US
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