Social Gatekeeping, the Serendipitous Tie and Discovery: Authors Connecting Readers to Books through Social Media Outreach

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301549
Title:
Social Gatekeeping, the Serendipitous Tie and Discovery: Authors Connecting Readers to Books through Social Media Outreach
Author:
Fulton, Bruce
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In 2011, over 1.5 million new book titles were published in the United States, a 400% increase in just five years compared to 2006. In the same time period, the market share for eBooks increased dramatically and now comprises 20% or more of sales from many of the biggest publishing companies. This hyper-abundance of titles in an increasingly heterogeneous market place has made it difficult for consumers to connect to books they might want to read. This is the discovery problem. It is compounded by the continuing decline of traditional gatekeepers and sources of discovery such as mass media reviews and advertising, as well as the decline of traditional bookstores where people often find books through browse. Authors and publishers therefore have turned to social media to spread the word about their titles. Social gatekeeping, an extension of traditional gatekeeping theory, is proposed as the framework for understanding how author participation in social networks initiates a flow of the diffusion of information over the web and other computer mediated communication channels, and through individuals and social networks to potential readers. Serendipitous browse and discovery is a key strategy for readers to find titles of interest, and the serendipitous tie is proposed as a social mechanism through which individuals discover new titles and bring it back to their social networks to share. To explore these concepts, a random sample of new eBook titles published during the first week of April, 2012 was generated and analyzed in three phases. The first phase of research classified books and authors according to facets such as traditional or self-published, use of social media and other factors. The second phase used multiple regression to establish an association between the use of social media by authors and a title's sales and presence on the Web. The third phase reviewed selected titles for new approaches to social media use and evidence of the serendipitous tie. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that author web presence predicts discoverability and sales.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Gatekeeping; Publishing; Self-publishing; Social Media; Information Resources & Library Science; Discovery
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Information Resources & Library Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bradley, Jana

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSocial Gatekeeping, the Serendipitous Tie and Discovery: Authors Connecting Readers to Books through Social Media Outreachen_US
dc.creatorFulton, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.authorFulton, Bruceen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 2011, over 1.5 million new book titles were published in the United States, a 400% increase in just five years compared to 2006. In the same time period, the market share for eBooks increased dramatically and now comprises 20% or more of sales from many of the biggest publishing companies. This hyper-abundance of titles in an increasingly heterogeneous market place has made it difficult for consumers to connect to books they might want to read. This is the discovery problem. It is compounded by the continuing decline of traditional gatekeepers and sources of discovery such as mass media reviews and advertising, as well as the decline of traditional bookstores where people often find books through browse. Authors and publishers therefore have turned to social media to spread the word about their titles. Social gatekeeping, an extension of traditional gatekeeping theory, is proposed as the framework for understanding how author participation in social networks initiates a flow of the diffusion of information over the web and other computer mediated communication channels, and through individuals and social networks to potential readers. Serendipitous browse and discovery is a key strategy for readers to find titles of interest, and the serendipitous tie is proposed as a social mechanism through which individuals discover new titles and bring it back to their social networks to share. To explore these concepts, a random sample of new eBook titles published during the first week of April, 2012 was generated and analyzed in three phases. The first phase of research classified books and authors according to facets such as traditional or self-published, use of social media and other factors. The second phase used multiple regression to establish an association between the use of social media by authors and a title's sales and presence on the Web. The third phase reviewed selected titles for new approaches to social media use and evidence of the serendipitous tie. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that author web presence predicts discoverability and sales.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectGatekeepingen_US
dc.subjectPublishingen_US
dc.subjectSelf-publishingen_US
dc.subjectSocial Mediaen_US
dc.subjectInformation Resources & Library Scienceen_US
dc.subjectDiscoveryen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInformation Resources & Library Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBradley, Janaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFrické, Martinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHeidorn, Patrick Bryanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBradley, Janaen_US
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