Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301343
Title:
Water in Wyoming - Availability, Regulatory Policies, and Climate Change in the Cowboy State
Author:
Wilson, Amber L.
Affiliation:
Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff
Issue Date:
14-Apr-2012
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
Climate change is real and may have devastating effects to a fragile world that is reaching beyond its capacity. This is especially true in the semi-arid areas of the western United States and particularly in Wyoming. The problem of climate change is serious and its solutions depend on the willingness of people to act on it with zeal in a coordinated and holistic manner. In particular, Wyoming is faced with possible water contamination from hydraulic fracturing operations. In the presence of continuing drought from climate change, such a problem in combination with the sheer amount of water required for fracturing practices can lead to serious water shortage. The objective of this study is to examine the current environmental policy in Wyoming and evaluate its ability to help adapt to climate change. This is very important and a clear understanding of existing environmental policies is necessary to develop and implement appropriate plans and procedures to protect the quality of the increasingly shrinking and valuable water supply in an effective, holistic and cost-effective manner. In this study, I expect to provide a comprehensive overview and understanding of the quantity, quality, allocation and use of the area’s groundwater and surface water under recurring climate change. Such information may lead to actions and steps that can be taken by Wyoming’s water stakeholders.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleWater in Wyoming - Availability, Regulatory Policies, and Climate Change in the Cowboy Stateen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Amber L.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentNorthern Arizona University, Flagstaffen_US
dc.date.issued2012-04-14-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractClimate change is real and may have devastating effects to a fragile world that is reaching beyond its capacity. This is especially true in the semi-arid areas of the western United States and particularly in Wyoming. The problem of climate change is serious and its solutions depend on the willingness of people to act on it with zeal in a coordinated and holistic manner. In particular, Wyoming is faced with possible water contamination from hydraulic fracturing operations. In the presence of continuing drought from climate change, such a problem in combination with the sheer amount of water required for fracturing practices can lead to serious water shortage. The objective of this study is to examine the current environmental policy in Wyoming and evaluate its ability to help adapt to climate change. This is very important and a clear understanding of existing environmental policies is necessary to develop and implement appropriate plans and procedures to protect the quality of the increasingly shrinking and valuable water supply in an effective, holistic and cost-effective manner. In this study, I expect to provide a comprehensive overview and understanding of the quantity, quality, allocation and use of the area’s groundwater and surface water under recurring climate change. Such information may lead to actions and steps that can be taken by Wyoming’s water stakeholders.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301343-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
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