Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/301313
Title:
Water Resources - The Primary Factor in Tucson's Future Growth
Author:
McLean, Thomas M.
Affiliation:
Tucson Water, Tucson, Arizona 85726
Issue Date:
24-Apr-1982
Rights:
Copyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.
Publisher:
Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Journal:
Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest
Abstract:
The community of Tucson faces a tremendous future challenge regarding the management of its local water resources. With the advent of the new Groundwater Code and a plan to balance the basin by the year 2025, it is impossible to discuss the growth of the metropolitan area without first questioning the availability of adequate water resources. In Tucson, water will soon become the yardstick by which community expansion will be measured. The Tucson Water Utility plays a significant role in the management of the local water resource. Although there is currently complete reliance on groundwater, Tucson has received a tentative allocation of Colorado River water by means of the Central Arizona Project to supplement the groundwater supply in the future. In addition, the reuse of wastewater effluent and further conservation efforts must be planned in order to accommodate growth. The key ingredient to regional resource management, however, involves the cooperation that must exist among the major water-using entities of the area: Tucson Water, the mines, farmers, private water companies, and private well owners. This paper addresses the potential favorable and unfavorable impacts of limited water resources on future growth with respect to these concerns.
Keywords:
Hydrology -- Arizona.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Hydrology -- Southwestern states.; Water resources development -- Southwestern states.
ISSN:
0272-6106

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleWater Resources - The Primary Factor in Tucson's Future Growthen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcLean, Thomas M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentTucson Water, Tucson, Arizona 85726en_US
dc.date.issued1982-04-24-
dc.rightsCopyright ©, where appropriate, is held by the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis article is part of the Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest collections. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science and the University of Arizona Libraries. For more information about items in this collection, contact anashydrology@gmail.com.en_US
dc.publisherArizona-Nevada Academy of Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.description.abstractThe community of Tucson faces a tremendous future challenge regarding the management of its local water resources. With the advent of the new Groundwater Code and a plan to balance the basin by the year 2025, it is impossible to discuss the growth of the metropolitan area without first questioning the availability of adequate water resources. In Tucson, water will soon become the yardstick by which community expansion will be measured. The Tucson Water Utility plays a significant role in the management of the local water resource. Although there is currently complete reliance on groundwater, Tucson has received a tentative allocation of Colorado River water by means of the Central Arizona Project to supplement the groundwater supply in the future. In addition, the reuse of wastewater effluent and further conservation efforts must be planned in order to accommodate growth. The key ingredient to regional resource management, however, involves the cooperation that must exist among the major water-using entities of the area: Tucson Water, the mines, farmers, private water companies, and private well owners. This paper addresses the potential favorable and unfavorable impacts of limited water resources on future growth with respect to these concerns.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Southwestern states.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0272-6106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/301313-
dc.identifier.journalHydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwesten_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeProceedingsen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.